Eighty Years of Book Cover Design

Joseph Connolly

Eighty Years of Book Cover Design

Joseph Connolly - book collector, antiquarian dealer, and acclaimed novelist - has compiled an impassioned guide and love letter to the designers, artists and authors at the heart of Faber's design story. From its beginnings in the 1920s and 1930s on to the classic years of innovation under Berthold Wolpe after the War, and from the celebrated period of collaboration with Pentagram on to the modern day, here is, as he concludes in his preface, 'a lavish celebration of the art and beauty of these magnificent covers, from just the first eighty years'. 3.5 out of 5 based on 2 reviews
Eighty Years of Book Cover Design

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Literary Studies & Criticism, Art, Architecture & Photography
Format Paperback
Pages 304
RRP £25.00
Date of Publication July 2009
ISBN 978-0571240012
Publisher Faber & Faber
 

Joseph Connolly - book collector, antiquarian dealer, and acclaimed novelist - has compiled an impassioned guide and love letter to the designers, artists and authors at the heart of Faber's design story. From its beginnings in the 1920s and 1930s on to the classic years of innovation under Berthold Wolpe after the War, and from the celebrated period of collaboration with Pentagram on to the modern day, here is, as he concludes in his preface, 'a lavish celebration of the art and beauty of these magnificent covers, from just the first eighty years'.

View a selection of covers from the book (Guardian website)

Reviews

The Observer

Peter Conrad

Apart from the obligatory roll-call of Faber classics, Connolly's selection is wittily unpredictable. The trouble is that he supplies no details about the forgotten books he has unearthed. I'm intrigued by Aaron Judah's The Fabulous Haircut, whose cover mixes a barber's kit of scissors, brush and razor with a painter's easel, a pistol and a robber's swag of loot...

12/07/2009

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The Spectator

Bevis Hillier

This is a glorious book with one crippling flaw. Let's put the ecstasy before the agony... Apart from the visual feast, this book is worth buying for two things: Joseph Connolly’s delightfully off-the-cuff, informal history of the firm and recollections of his own associations with it... Now for the agony. Not only is there no caption under any of the plates in Connolly’s book; there is nowhere in the book that tells us, in any convenient way, who designed them and when.

15/07/2009

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