In a Strange Room

Damon Galgut

In a Strange Room

A young man takes three journeys, through Greece, India and Africa. He travels lightly, simply. To those who travel with him and those whom he meets on the way - including a handsome, enigmatic stranger, a group of careless backpackers and a woman on the edge - he is the Follower, the Lover and the Guardian. Yet, despite the man's best intentions, each journey ends in disaster. Together, these three journeys will change his whole life. A novel of longing and thwarted desire, rage and compassion, "In a Strange Room" is a haunting evocation of one man's search for love, and a place to call home. 4.8 out of 5 based on 5 reviews
In a Strange Room

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General Fiction
Format Hardback
Pages 256
RRP £15.99
Date of Publication April 2010
ISBN 978-1848873223
Publisher Atlantic
 

A young man takes three journeys, through Greece, India and Africa. He travels lightly, simply. To those who travel with him and those whom he meets on the way - including a handsome, enigmatic stranger, a group of careless backpackers and a woman on the edge - he is the Follower, the Lover and the Guardian. Yet, despite the man's best intentions, each journey ends in disaster. Together, these three journeys will change his whole life. A novel of longing and thwarted desire, rage and compassion, "In a Strange Room" is a haunting evocation of one man's search for love, and a place to call home.

Read an extract from the book on the Guardian's website

Reviews

The Guardian

Jan Morris

I doubt if any book in 2010 will contain more memorable evocations of place than In a Strange Room... Humour is not Galgut's strong point, not even black humour, and there is a kind of nihilism to the book's philosophy ... Oddly enough, though, In A Strange Room has left me with a soothing sense of serenity. It is a very beautiful book for one thing, strikingly conceived and hauntingly written, a writer's novel par excellence without a clumsy word in it. But perhaps even more important, constantly through the sadnesses and the pathos, the disappointments and the disillusionments, kindness shines.

22/05/2010

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The Observer

William Skidelsky

Superb… Galgut is hardly an unknown quantity … But with this new book he has struck out in a new direction and taken his writing to a whole other level. It is a quite astonishing work.

25/07/2010

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The Daily Telegraph

Philip Womack

The ordered prose, brimming with tension, is written in a mixture of the third and first persons, even within paragraphs. This is not confusing and, in fact, casts a beguiling spell. The narrator is both involved and distant… Galgut has produced an excellent piece of work that is as inviting as it is troubling.

03/05/2010

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Times Literary Supplement

Toby Lichtig

Each section of the novel works well as a story in its own right – indeed “The Lover” was chosen for last year’s O. Henry Award – but as a triptych the result is devastating… This is a wise and brilliant book, its shadows dark and lasting. It is also a salient warning for anyone who has ever gone away to escape the self.

28/05/2010

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The Sunday Times

Robert Collins

Powerful… In Galgut’s deceptively simple prose, these pieces linger — like his eternally lost traveller-narrator — in an impressively indefinable no man’s land between memoir and fiction. It’s quite an achievement to have made real stories feel as bewitching and unnerving as fables.

08/08/2010

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