Started Early, Took My Dog

Kate Atkinson

Started Early, Took My Dog

A day like any other for security chief Tracy Waterhouse, until she makes a purchase she hadn't bargained for. One moment of madness is all it takes for Tracy's humdrum world to be turned upside down, the tedium of everyday life replaced by fear and danger at every turn. Witnesses to Tracy's Faustian exchange in the Merrion Centre in Leeds are Tilly, an elderly actress teetering on the brink of her own disaster, and Jackson Brodie who has returned to his home county in search of someone else's roots. All three characters learn that the past is never history and that no good deed goes unpunished. 3.6 out of 5 based on 6 reviews
Started Early, Took My Dog

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre Crime, Thrillers & Mystery
Format Hardback
Pages 352
RRP £18.99
Date of Publication August 2010
ISBN 978-0385608022
Publisher Doubleday
 

A day like any other for security chief Tracy Waterhouse, until she makes a purchase she hadn't bargained for. One moment of madness is all it takes for Tracy's humdrum world to be turned upside down, the tedium of everyday life replaced by fear and danger at every turn. Witnesses to Tracy's Faustian exchange in the Merrion Centre in Leeds are Tilly, an elderly actress teetering on the brink of her own disaster, and Jackson Brodie who has returned to his home county in search of someone else's roots. All three characters learn that the past is never history and that no good deed goes unpunished.

Reviews

The Daily Telegraph

Helen Brown

As ever, Atkinson’s prose is diamond-cut to twinkle and slice by turns. Her playful sense of humour dances round the darkness of her themes. She skips through the difficult steps required to balance the reader’s need for satisfying (and surprising) resolution with a realist’s view of human nature and the messiness of real-life criminality.

18/08/2010

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The Sunday Times

Lindsay Duguid

Atkinson’s ear for speech is sharp and salty; terms such as punter, slapper, scrubber and good time girl are bandied about; and her names — Ray Strickland, Len Lomax, Kelly Cross, Barry Crawford — are wonderfully apt. There are sardonic jokes, an enjoyable satire on a mindless television crime series called Collier, and some knowing play with genre conventions... Crime has given Atkinson the freedom to write an ambitious, panoramic work, full of excitement, colour and compassion. Started Early, Took My Dog should be as successful as its predecessors

08/08/2010

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Times Literary Supplement

Kate Webb

Atkinson’s triumph in this series is in making over the logic of the crime novel – of hunter and prey – into a realm where women are heard and felt... She avoids the genre’s pitfalls and tendency to exploitation by making her victims fully human, never ciphers; and having no interest in types. There are no discussions here of “the mind of a serial killer”, and Brodie is increasingly adrift in the story rather than key to it.

11/08/2010

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The Guardian

Justine Jordan

So much of the narrative is retrospective or interior that there's not much urgency to unfolding events, however highly coloured. And there's a rhetorical whimsy reminiscent of some of Atkinson's earlier books, a devil-may-care gesturing at the novel's own fictionality, which can leave the characters threatening to float free of our trust in them. But we follow their digressive, meandering voices avidly as they circle around their own particular loves and losses, all knitted together with Atkinson's extraordinary combination of wit, plain-speaking, tenderness and control.

14/08/2010

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The Literary Review

Jessica Mann

Trying to follow the zany plot requires concentration but the original and amusing writing makes it worth the effort.

01/08/2010

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The Daily Express

Tina Moran

The novels are more about him and other characters than crime solving which in the previous books has not been a problem. However this time it was a hindrance as the story ends frustratingly without having tied-up all the loose ends. The result is by far the weakest of the Brodie collection.

06/08/2010

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