When Will There Be Good News?

Kate Atkinson

When Will There Be Good News?

In rural Devon, six-year-old Joanna Mason witnesses an appalling crime. Thirty years later the man convicted of the crime is released from prison. In Edinburgh, sixteen-year-old Reggie works as a nanny for a G.P. But Dr Hunter has gone missing and Reggie seems to be the only person who is worried. Across town, Detective Chief Inspector Louise Monroe is also looking for a missing person, unaware that hurtling towards her is an old friend - Jackson Brodie - himself on a journey that becomes fatally interrupted. 5.0 out of 5 based on 7 reviews
When Will There Be Good News?

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General Fiction, Crime, Thrillers & Mystery
Format Hardback
Pages 352
RRP £17.99
Date of Publication August 2008
ISBN 978-0385608015
Publisher Doubleday
 

In rural Devon, six-year-old Joanna Mason witnesses an appalling crime. Thirty years later the man convicted of the crime is released from prison. In Edinburgh, sixteen-year-old Reggie works as a nanny for a G.P. But Dr Hunter has gone missing and Reggie seems to be the only person who is worried. Across town, Detective Chief Inspector Louise Monroe is also looking for a missing person, unaware that hurtling towards her is an old friend - Jackson Brodie - himself on a journey that becomes fatally interrupted.

Reviews

The Guardian

Patrick Ness

Swiping a polished dagger through her Gordian knot, Atkinson began tackling life and death and fate and love with a freedom and fluency unseen in her earlier novels. By becoming a crime writer, she has - in a way that other "literary" types may wish to note - become a better literary writer than ever: funny, bracingly intelligent and delightfully prickly.

16/08/2008

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The Independent

Rebecca Armstrong

The fast pace, while exhilarating, is never exhausting. As in the best crime fiction, dramatic events and unexpected twists abound, but Atkinson subverts the genre by refusing to neatly tie up every thread. And while there is plenty of blood and bitterness, redemption and resolve are well represented too. Good news all round.

22/08/2008

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The Observer

Peter Guttridge

There is humour - and terrific chapter titles - but on the whole the tone is dark. Not that that matters; When Will There Be Good News? is simply a fine read.

31/08/2008

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The Scotsman

David Robinson

Atkinson's latest (darkest? bloodiest? most free-wheeling?) slice of make-belief has attitude and altitude in abundance.It pushes its luck in taking coincidence and outlandishness to levels of sheer unadulterated chutzpah, and by its stomach-curdling ending, it's so accelerated that you're waiting for the wheels to come off. They don't.

12/09/2008

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Scotland on Sunday

Peggy Hughes

Atkinson's prose wipes a hand across its face and laughs. That way "the random horror of the world" is rendered more palatable. An irresistible melange of propulsive plot and tangible Everypersons, this book whistles along the dark path of the world's "lonesome highway" and shows that, with the right attitude, news needn't always be bad news.

03/08/2008

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The Daily Telegraph

Lucy Beresford

It is immaculately - even lovingly - paced, and it is a measure of Atkinson's talent that I read it in one sitting. After all, how could you possibly not fall in love with a writer whose sharp eye skewers the pre-pubescent girls on the top of a bus, 'all fruity lip gloss and incredibly tedious secrets'. So, put very simply, the answer to the title is: when you buy this insightful, often funny, life-affirming novel.

24/08/2008

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The Sunday Times

Joan Smith

When Will There Be Good News? is not a detective novel in the formal sense, although it is full of unsolved mysteries and suspense. It is one of those rare fictions that defies categorisation, creating a milieu that is a recognisable version of the real world but inflected with its author's preoccupations...the novel contains startling moments of truth, and its insights into human nature are simply superb.

31/08/2008

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