A Film by Spencer Ludwig

David Flusfeder

A Film by Spencer Ludwig

A hilarious and heartbreaking father-son road movie of a novel. Spencer Ludwig, idealist and filmmaker, is making one of his regular duty visits from London to New York City to tend to his declining but still fearsome father. Driving back from one of their doctors' appointments, Spencer decides not to take the turn to his father's apartment: instead, they hit the road. 2.9 out of 5 based on 5 reviews
A Film by Spencer Ludwig

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General Fiction
Format Paperback
Pages 208
RRP £11.99
Date of Publication February 2011
ISBN 978-0007250318
Publisher Fourth Estate
 

A hilarious and heartbreaking father-son road movie of a novel. Spencer Ludwig, idealist and filmmaker, is making one of his regular duty visits from London to New York City to tend to his declining but still fearsome father. Driving back from one of their doctors' appointments, Spencer decides not to take the turn to his father's apartment: instead, they hit the road.

Reviews

The Guardian

Nicholas Lezard

This novel is itself an enactment and an exploration of a father/son relationship. One gets the impression that it was written quickly, but not carelessly, so as not to make heavy weather of the things one feels when contemplating an unsatisfactory or baffling relationship. One of the novel's great successes is its perfectly judged tone, the deftness of its touch – so deft it doesn't even draw attention to its own deftness.

12/02/2011

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The Daily Mail

Hephzibah Anderson

David Flusfeder is a stylishly masculine writer, and he pays fine tribute to the tenacious love that somehow binds this unlikeliest of father-son teams.

19/02/2010

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The Observer

Chris Cox

It is admittedly a rather hammy premise on which to hang a novel ... And if you can't see yourself forgiving him, then perhaps it's not for you ... Formally, the novel jumps excitedly around ... But this patchwork quality becomes part of its charm, and the story has such momentum that nothing can knock it off course.

13/02/2011

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The Independent

Brandon Robshaw

Both father and son are prickly, principled characters – there is a crackle and tension in their dialogue, rendered poignant by the elder man's stroke-induced aphasia. A tragicomic novel about middle- and old-age, and the father-son relationship.

20/02/2011

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The Daily Telegraph

Sameer Rahim

Unlike Flusfeder’s The Gift (2003), A Film by Spencer Ludwig does not sustain its momentum throughout. At one point Spencer mentions The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (the film version, naturally) but the original Thurber short story, with its car-bound loneliness and fantasy dealt with in a few pages, might have been a better model for the author.

09/02/2010

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