Cold Light

Jenn Ashworth

Cold Light

I'm sitting on my couch, watching the local news. There's Chloe's parents, the mayor, the hangers on, all grouped round the pond for the ceremony. It's ten years since Chloe and Carl drowned, and they've finally chosen a memorial - a stupid summerhouse. The mayor has a spade decked out in pink and white ribbon, and he's started to dig. You can tell from their faces that something has gone wrong. But I'm the one who knows straightaway that the mayor has found a body. And I know who it is. This is the tale of three fourteen-year-old girls and a volatile combination of lies, jealousy and perversion that ends in tragedy. Except the tragedy is even darker and more tangled than their tight-knit community has been persuaded to believe. 3.7 out of 5 based on 3 reviews
Cold Light

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General Fiction
Format Hardcover
Pages 352
RRP £12.99
Date of Publication April 2011
ISBN 978-1444721447
Publisher Sceptre
 

I'm sitting on my couch, watching the local news. There's Chloe's parents, the mayor, the hangers on, all grouped round the pond for the ceremony. It's ten years since Chloe and Carl drowned, and they've finally chosen a memorial - a stupid summerhouse. The mayor has a spade decked out in pink and white ribbon, and he's started to dig. You can tell from their faces that something has gone wrong. But I'm the one who knows straightaway that the mayor has found a body. And I know who it is. This is the tale of three fourteen-year-old girls and a volatile combination of lies, jealousy and perversion that ends in tragedy. Except the tragedy is even darker and more tangled than their tight-knit community has been persuaded to believe.

Read an extract from the book on The Times website

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Reviews

The Independent

Anita Sethi

Ashworth's real subject is how we are unwittingly hurt by those in whom we have placed trust. Cold Light is filled with bruises, bleeding and psychological bludgeoning. A novel also about the power and pitfalls of narrative, it is told by the hand of a true storyteller.

10/06/2011

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The Sunday Times

Lucy Scholes

Ashworth’s novel is bleak and gritty, painting an uncompromising portrait of teenage life in a drab northern town, and her prose is equally grimy and visceral ... In the best possible way this novel is an uncomfortable read. Ashworth has the rare gift of being able to make her reader feel perverse and voyeuristic, implicated somehow in the tragedy laid out on the pages. She builds her tension excruciatingly slowly — perhaps too slowly on occasion, as the denouement doesn’t quite pack the expected punch.

15/05/2011

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The Guardian

Alfred Hickling

... another cleverly skewed tale told from the self-conscious perspective of an outsider ... [but] even the most luminous writing becomes dulled if the plot is left to drag on inconclusively for too long ...

17/06/2011

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