The Science Delusion: Freeing the Spirit of Enquiry

Rupert Sheldrake

The Science Delusion: Freeing the Spirit of Enquiry

The science delusion is the belief that science already understands the nature of reality. The fundamental questions are answered, leaving only the details to be filled in. In this book, Dr Rupert Sheldrake, one of the world's most innovative scientists, shows that science is being constricted by assumptions that have hardened into dogmas. The 'scientific worldview' has become a belief system. All reality is material or physical. The world is a machine, made up of dead matter. Nature is purposeless. Consciousness is nothing but the physical activity of the brain. Free will is an illusion. God exists only as an idea in human minds, imprisoned within our skulls. Sheldrake examines these dogmas scientifically, and argues that science would be better off without them: freer, more interesting, and more fun. 3.6 out of 5 based on 4 reviews
The Science Delusion: Freeing the Spirit of Enquiry

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Science & Nature
Format Hardback
Pages 400
RRP £19.99
Date of Publication January 2012
ISBN 978-1444727920
Publisher Coronet
 

The science delusion is the belief that science already understands the nature of reality. The fundamental questions are answered, leaving only the details to be filled in. In this book, Dr Rupert Sheldrake, one of the world's most innovative scientists, shows that science is being constricted by assumptions that have hardened into dogmas. The 'scientific worldview' has become a belief system. All reality is material or physical. The world is a machine, made up of dead matter. Nature is purposeless. Consciousness is nothing but the physical activity of the brain. Free will is an illusion. God exists only as an idea in human minds, imprisoned within our skulls. Sheldrake examines these dogmas scientifically, and argues that science would be better off without them: freer, more interesting, and more fun.

Reviews

The Independent

Colin Tudge

In The Science Delusion, Rupert Sheldrake drags ten of the most powerful dogmas out of the basement and into the light of day; and does science, humanity and the world a large, a considerable favour ... If Rupert Sheldrake was simply a commentator, sniping from a distance, his arguments might be swept aside. But he is a scientist himself, through and through

06/01/2012

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The Scotsman

Michael Kerrigan

As a critique of conventional approaches, overly categorical and insufficiently self-questioning, The Science Delusion scores a fair few hits. Less immediately convincing (though in many ways more interesting) is Sheldrake’s vision of where science should be venturing: is the universe alive — a living consciousness? How — if at all — does meditation work? Can acquired characteristics be inherited? Is it possible for our minds to transcend our brains? Such things, he claims, can be scientifically tested.

21/01/2012

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The Spectator

James Le Fanu

[Sheldrake] interrogates each [core belief] in turn by reformulating it, in the spirit of radical scepticism, as a question. Are the laws of nature fixed? Is biological inheritance material? Are minds confined to brains? This Socratic method of inquiry proves surprisingly illuminating ... Regrettably Sheldrake does not confine himself to asking these searching questions but periodically interpolates his own favoured theory of interconnections between the physical and living world, known as morphic resonance. Still, those who read selectively, perhaps humming their way through the relevant passages, will find this a seriously mind-expanding book.

14/01/2012

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The Financial Times

Crispin Tickell

Whether or not the theory of morphic resonance can provide a framework for answers, Sheldrake raises questions that are useful in themselves. The hostility with which his ideas have been received in some quarters may itself be a recommendation. Whatever else, he cannot be dismissed as a nutcase. Certainly we need to accept the limitations of much current dogma and keep our minds as open as we reasonably can. Sheldrake may help us to do so through this well-written, challenging and always interesting book.

06/01/2012

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