Suddenly, a Knock on the Door

Etgar Keret

Suddenly, a Knock on the Door

Etgar Keret is an ingenious and original master of the short story. Hilarious, witty and always unusual, declared a 'genius' by the New York Times, Keret brings all of his prodigious talent to bear in this, his sixth bestselling collection. 3.5 out of 5 based on 3 reviews
Suddenly, a Knock on the Door

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre Short Stories
Format Hardcover
Pages 304
RRP £12.99
Date of Publication February 2012
ISBN 978-0701186678
Publisher Chatto & Windus
 

Etgar Keret is an ingenious and original master of the short story. Hilarious, witty and always unusual, declared a 'genius' by the New York Times, Keret brings all of his prodigious talent to bear in this, his sixth bestselling collection.

Read a story from the collection on The Guardian website

Kneller's Happy Campers by Etgar Keret

Reviews

The Guardian

Ian Sansom

The stories are all thought-experiments. What if, they ask. Why not? And, what the heck? Like all art, they are highly patterned, highly charged, refracted reflections on the chaos and randomness of everyday existence.

23/02/2012

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The Independent

Stuart Evers

Keret's stories explore the shaded space between joke and fable, between human understanding and the impossibilities of the world. The language is simple, almost brusque; the short narratives often occupy fewer than ten pages. They read as encounters, Keret choosing to leave a story hanging when so much more could have been exposed, or beginning tales so far into the action or emotion that it's almost over before you know where you are. It is a risky strategy, but one that forces the reader to mull on what has gone before. In Keret's hands, it is a winning formula.

17/02/2012

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Times Literary Supplement

Mark Kamine

The current collection, rendered into appropriately colloquial English by translators Miriam Shlesinger, Sondra Silverston and the similarly acclaimed short-story writer Nathan Englander, finds Keret in a lighter and less rigorous mode, piling on trick endings and fantastical developments. The easy jokes and thinly built characters are more suitably comparable to sketch comedy and sitcom than the grand literary forebears whom Keret invokes.

27/04/2012

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