The Man Who Forgot His Wife

John O'Farrell

The Man Who Forgot His Wife

Lots of husbands forget things: they forget that their wife had an important meeting that morning; they forget to pick up the dry cleaning; some of them even forget their wedding anniversary. But Vaughan has forgotten he even has a wife. Her name, her face, their history together, everything she has ever told him, everything he has said to her - it has all gone, mysteriously wiped in one catastrophic moment of memory loss. And now he has rediscovered her - only to find out that they are getting divorced. 3.6 out of 5 based on 4 reviews
The Man Who Forgot His Wife

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General Fiction
Format Hardcover
Pages 320
RRP
Date of Publication March 2012
ISBN 978-0385606103
Publisher Doubleday
 

Lots of husbands forget things: they forget that their wife had an important meeting that morning; they forget to pick up the dry cleaning; some of them even forget their wedding anniversary. But Vaughan has forgotten he even has a wife. Her name, her face, their history together, everything she has ever told him, everything he has said to her - it has all gone, mysteriously wiped in one catastrophic moment of memory loss. And now he has rediscovered her - only to find out that they are getting divorced.

An Utterly Exasperated History of Modern Britain by John O'Farrell

Reviews

The Guardian

Harry Ritchie

It's a rare treat to come across a comic novel that is both thoroughly comic and thoughtfully acute about love, and life, and stuff.

16/03/2012

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The Independent on Sunday

James Kidd

Indeed, what elevates O'Farrell's fourth novel above his first is that its comic routines are imbued with emotion ... Not everything works. Witness the images of tents collapsing allegorically. (Like a relationship they need two poles to stay up.) The brief attempt to explore history isn't any more convincing than it was in Julian Barnes's The Sense of an Ending. And Vaughan's recovery of his pedagogical passion via a student called Tanika feels sketched more than developed.

25/03/2012

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The Daily Mail

Stephanie Cross

There’s a little light philosophy - ‘history is not what definitely happened’, Vaughan informs his Year 11s - and a big, cosy moral along the lines of forgetting our own niggles in order to remember what really counts. As they say, what’s not to like?

08/03/2012

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The Spectator

Diana Hendry

I read this novel while convalescing from pneumonia. It proved admirably fit for purpose. A light diet, mildly entertaining and with enough twists and turns of plot to serve as a tonic.

24/03/2012

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