Blind Sunflowers

Alberto Méndez, Nick Caistor (trs.)

Blind Sunflowers

A captain in Franco's army, on the same day as the victory, renounces wining the war; a young poet runs away with his pregnant girlfriend to grow up quickly and die within few months; a prisoner in Porlier's jail, who refuses to live a lie so that his executioner can gain moral authority; and a lustful deacon who hides his desire behind the apostolic fascism that clamours for the purifying blood of the defeated. These are stories from silent times, when it was terrifying that anyone knew what you knew. Four subtly connected stories, narrated with the same language but with the individual styles of the different narrators that shape the true main protagonist of this story: defeat. 4.2 out of 5 based on 2 reviews
Blind Sunflowers

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General Fiction
Format Paperback
Pages 160
RRP £10.99
Date of Publication July 2008
ISBN 978-1905147779
Publisher Arcadia
 

A captain in Franco's army, on the same day as the victory, renounces wining the war; a young poet runs away with his pregnant girlfriend to grow up quickly and die within few months; a prisoner in Porlier's jail, who refuses to live a lie so that his executioner can gain moral authority; and a lustful deacon who hides his desire behind the apostolic fascism that clamours for the purifying blood of the defeated. These are stories from silent times, when it was terrifying that anyone knew what you knew. Four subtly connected stories, narrated with the same language but with the individual styles of the different narrators that shape the true main protagonist of this story: defeat.

Reviews

The Financial Times

Melissa McClements

Méndez’s grim stories focus on the hopelessness of the defeated. However, they offer no sweeping polarities and refuse to accept the simplicity of a binary world: left versus right, freedom versus oppression, good versus evil. Here, suffering is universal.

29/09/2008

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The Observer

Mary Fitzgerald

To start afresh is to accept responsibility,' Alberto Méndez writes; in order for Spain to exhume its ghosts and move forward, it must remember its past, which is what this novel, comprising four stories set during the final throes of the civil war, aims to do. Laudable though this may be, in literary terms it's of limited value. It starts off promisingly enough with the narrative of Captain Alegria, who decides to surrender to the enemy on the eve of victory, but the subsequent voices are realised with less success.

28/09/2008

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