The Complete Poems

Philip Larkin, Archie Burnett (ed.)

The Complete Poems

This entirely new edition brings together all of Philip Larkin's poems. In addition to those in Collected Poems (1988), and in the Early Poems and Juvenilia (2005), some unpublished pieces from Larkin's typescripts and workbooks are included, as well as verse (by turns scurrilous, satirical, affectionate, and sentimental) tucked away in his letters. The manuscript and printed sources have been scrutinized afresh; more detailed accounts than hitherto available of the sources of the text and of dates of composition are provided; and previous accounts of composition dates have been corrected. Variant wordings from Larkin's typescripts and the early printings are recorded. For the first time, the poems are given a comprehensive commentary. 4.1 out of 5 based on 4 reviews
The Complete Poems

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre Poetry
Format Hardcover
Pages 768
RRP £40.00
Date of Publication January 2012
ISBN 978-0571240067
Publisher Faber and Faber
 

This entirely new edition brings together all of Philip Larkin's poems. In addition to those in Collected Poems (1988), and in the Early Poems and Juvenilia (2005), some unpublished pieces from Larkin's typescripts and workbooks are included, as well as verse (by turns scurrilous, satirical, affectionate, and sentimental) tucked away in his letters. The manuscript and printed sources have been scrutinized afresh; more detailed accounts than hitherto available of the sources of the text and of dates of composition are provided; and previous accounts of composition dates have been corrected. Variant wordings from Larkin's typescripts and the early printings are recorded. For the first time, the poems are given a comprehensive commentary.

Letters to Monica by Philip Larkin

Reviews

The Sunday Times

Alan Brownjohn

When a definitive edition such as this appears, there can be cries of “Is it really needed?” In this case, the book is clearly not suitable as a gift for those who know Larkin only through a few of the famous poems, nor is it for the curious newcomer. But for those familiar, say, with the books, or with either of the two editions of Collected Poems, who know the letters and want to go further, it will prove compelling, even essential reading.

15/04/2012

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The Evening Standard

David Sexton

As the years go by, it is becoming steadily clearer that Larkin is the post-war British poet who matters most, on every level, from his influence on other poets to his permanent, ready presence in the minds of all his readers - for he is, as Martin Amis said, borrowing a term from Nabokov, not just memorable but mnemogenic. There is no need deliberately to commit Larkin's poems to memory; they enter into your very being of their own accord ... It's also laughably easy to spot the same thing happening in the published work of many subsequent British poets, who, reaching for greatness themselves, repeatedly end up doing little more than channelling him, our last two Poet Laureates being particularly susceptible to this inadvertent form of loyal tribute.

26/01/2012

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The Guardian

John Banville

The Burnett view is both panoptic and microscopic. The critical apparatus he erects approaches the shaky heights of Babel, yet the wealth and profusion of detail within it would purblind Larkin's own shivering sizar.

25/01/2012

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The Independent

Fiona Sampson

As the 20th century recedes, Larkin seems more and more to be the writer today's British verse has to come to terms with … Like dogs nesting in old blankets, writers routinely preserve unpublished drafts and jottings; archives collect such methodological evidence. This indicates no writerly intention that they should form part of the published oeuvre. To be exhaustive, as Burnett brilliantly is, is not necessarily the same as to be comprehensive. This book does indeed give us substantially more of Larkin. But the true gain is in Burnett's own precise, insightful exegesis.

20/01/2012

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