Of Love and Evil

Anne Rice

Of Love and Evil

Anne Rice's extraordinary new novel summons the world of fifteenth-century Rome: a city of beauty and terror, of art and sin. In this extraordinary setting Toby O'Dare, former government assassin, is called upon by the angel Malchiah, to solve a terrible crime of poisoning and to seek out the truth behind the presence of an earthbound restless spirit - a diabolical dybbuk - that is causing chaos in the city. 2.3 out of 5 based on 3 reviews
Of Love and Evil

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General Fiction, Science Fiction & Fantasy
Format Paperback
Pages 192
RRP £7.99
Date of Publication June 2011
ISBN 978-0099484202
Publisher Arrow
 

Anne Rice's extraordinary new novel summons the world of fifteenth-century Rome: a city of beauty and terror, of art and sin. In this extraordinary setting Toby O'Dare, former government assassin, is called upon by the angel Malchiah, to solve a terrible crime of poisoning and to seek out the truth behind the presence of an earthbound restless spirit - a diabolical dybbuk - that is causing chaos in the city.

Read the Omnivore roundup for CALLED OUT OF DARKNESS.

Reviews

The New York Times

Jan Stuart

Once Rice deposits him in the thick of Renaissance Italy, she jump-starts a fleet and nuanced theological ghost story. “Of Love and Evil” arrives in the wake of Rice’s well-publicized rejection of Roman Catholicism. Her struggle with a bruised faith seems to bristle on every page.

24/12/2010

Read Full Review


The Washington Post

Lloyd Rose

Unfortunately, "Of Love and Evil" has all the flaws of "Angel Time," though its plot is better ... Her prose is purple (and scarlet and black and gold), and her vampire sex scenes read like over-perfumed soft-porn fantasies. But what always sets her apart from her imitators is the energy roiling under that languidness.

21/12/2010

Read Full Review


The Independent on Sunday

David Evans

Unfortunately, Rice's descriptions of Renaissance Italy fail to convince, and her tendency to break into strained, God-praising rhapsodies is off-putting. Indeed, the book steams with such hot and fervid expressions of faith that you feel like throwing a bucket of cold water over it.

10/07/2011

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore