The Knickerbocker Glory Years

Martin Lampen

The Knickerbocker Glory Years

Martin Lampen is thirty-two years old. And in every one of his thirty-two years of living and dining in Britain, he hasn't eaten a single truly great meal. Is it linked to the fact that we Brits regard any artificial drink with pineapple flavouring as 'tropical'? Could it be something to do with our penchant for crinkle-cut crisps? And just why are British breadcrumbs yellow? This is a hilarious, nostalgic and irreverent look at British cuisine past and present in all its flavourless, stodgy splendour, and an indispensable A-Z guide to the not-so-wondrous world of British cuisine. All the joys and tragedies are in here, from buffet cars and boil-in-the-bag gammon supreme to white wine sauce and Wagon Wheels. 2.5 out of 5 based on 1 reviews
The Knickerbocker Glory Years

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Food & Drink
Format Paperback
Pages 336
RRP £8.99
Date of Publication October 2008
ISBN 978-0747592969
Publisher Bloomsbury
 

Martin Lampen is thirty-two years old. And in every one of his thirty-two years of living and dining in Britain, he hasn't eaten a single truly great meal. Is it linked to the fact that we Brits regard any artificial drink with pineapple flavouring as 'tropical'? Could it be something to do with our penchant for crinkle-cut crisps? And just why are British breadcrumbs yellow? This is a hilarious, nostalgic and irreverent look at British cuisine past and present in all its flavourless, stodgy splendour, and an indispensable A-Z guide to the not-so-wondrous world of British cuisine. All the joys and tragedies are in here, from buffet cars and boil-in-the-bag gammon supreme to white wine sauce and Wagon Wheels.

Reviews

The Observer

Hermione Hoby

Lampen's A-Z of British food is both indisputably silly and moderately tasty. However, as the initial comedic flourish of each entry fizzles away to a disheartening mess, you may start to feel queasy. Most entries, such as pickled onions, cinema food and bubblegum, begin with Lampen declaring his love for the food in question in the laddish, faux-ironic mode in which 'brilliant' and 'rubbish' are interchangeable terms of approval: an idea more British than the Knickerbocker Glory itself.

19/10/2008

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