Mrs Charles Darwin’s Recipe Book

Dusha Bateson, Wesley Janeway

Mrs Charles Darwin’s Recipe Book

More than a cookbook, the Mrs. Charles Darwin's Recipe Book delineates a lifestyle at the top of English society and intelligentsia at the time. This treasure trove that includes unlikely dishes such as Turnips Cresselly and Penally Pudding contains, even, another cook evident in the work: The recipe for boiling rice is in Charles Darwin's own hand. The image of Darwin standing over a pot of boiling water with his pocket watch in hand, is one to savour, along with every other vestige of a lost kitchen and lifestyle come back to life here. 3.2 out of 5 based on 2 reviews
Mrs Charles Darwin’s Recipe Book

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Food & Drink
Format Hardback
Pages 144
RRP £17.99
Date of Publication October 2008
ISBN 978-0980155730
Publisher TradeSelect
 

More than a cookbook, the Mrs. Charles Darwin's Recipe Book delineates a lifestyle at the top of English society and intelligentsia at the time. This treasure trove that includes unlikely dishes such as Turnips Cresselly and Penally Pudding contains, even, another cook evident in the work: The recipe for boiling rice is in Charles Darwin's own hand. The image of Darwin standing over a pot of boiling water with his pocket watch in hand, is one to savour, along with every other vestige of a lost kitchen and lifestyle come back to life here.

Read an interview with the author and a sample recipe from the book on the Telegraph website

Reviews

The Spectator

Jonathan Keates

Some of her dishes, even in the context of a most attractively produced book combining the practical and the informative in an ideally Victorian fashion, have too irredeemably period a look. Arrowroot pudding belongs firmly to the sickroom and a boiled chicken garnished with macaroni is rather too Mrs-Beetonish for my taste. I enjoyed making several others, such as Nesselrode pudding (exquisite), beef collops (interesting), and rice patties (toothsome)

01/04/2009

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The Daily Mail

Christopher Hudson

An unnatural selection of cream puddings, cheese custards, buttered eggs, blancmanges, potato rissoles, syllabubs and Yorkshire puddings, its main usefulness in these frugal times is the light it sheds on Charles Darwin's recurring indigestion. With ten children (of whom three died), Emma presumably relied on cook to make the recipes work.

23/01/2009

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