Pie: A Global History

Janet Clarkson

Pie: A Global History

In writing a whole book about pies, Janet Clarkson hopes to redress what she feels is a glaring omission from culinary history. "Pie" explores the development of this most esteemed article of food, from its purely pragmatic (and no doubt somewhat ugly) beginnings in ancient history, to its present elevation as the highest expression of culinary art. Clarkson does not shy away from the seamier side of the story, nor does she neglect the symbolic role of the pie, its commercial applications or its many international variations. The book touches upon the pie's nutritional value and its cultural significance - and it even has some fun with linguistics. This book is intended not just to relate a dry factual history of the pie, but to celebrate its very existence. 2.0 out of 5 based on 2 reviews
Pie: A Global History

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Food & Drink
Format Hardback
Pages 128
RRP £8.99
Date of Publication March 2009
ISBN 978-1861894250
Publisher Reaktion
 

In writing a whole book about pies, Janet Clarkson hopes to redress what she feels is a glaring omission from culinary history. "Pie" explores the development of this most esteemed article of food, from its purely pragmatic (and no doubt somewhat ugly) beginnings in ancient history, to its present elevation as the highest expression of culinary art. Clarkson does not shy away from the seamier side of the story, nor does she neglect the symbolic role of the pie, its commercial applications or its many international variations. The book touches upon the pie's nutritional value and its cultural significance - and it even has some fun with linguistics. This book is intended not just to relate a dry factual history of the pie, but to celebrate its very existence.

Reviews

The Guardian

Tom Jaine

...the new Edible series from Reaktion is to be welcomed. More titles have appeared, including Pie by Janet Clarkson and Spices by Fred Czarra. Short and sweet, they should address the question of cookery. Alas, they don't... The pie book fails to include most pies from beyond Britain, and relies on anecdote rather than structure for its British account. Writing and conceiving short books is a great art, and these are apprentice pieces.

13/06/2009

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The Observer

Paul Levy

The latest three titles in this series of miniature, illustrated monographs about food history vary hugely... Janet Clarkson, in Pie: A Global History, is considerably more interesting to observe, as she chattily struggles to define "pie".

07/06/2009

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