Medical London: City of Diseases, City of Cures

Richard Barnett, Mike Jay

Medical London: City of Diseases, City of Cures

A well presented guide to London's past and a treasure trove of information for historians, residents, medical professionals and tourists, Medical London charts the many roles that diseases, treatments and cures have played in the city's sprawling story. It also reveals how London, in turn, has shaped the professions and practices of modern medicine. 4.2 out of 5 based on 2 reviews
Medical London: City of Diseases, City of Cures

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre History, Health & Medical
Format Paperback
Pages 500
RRP £15.99
Date of Publication November 2008
ISBN 978-0955876103
Publisher Strange Attractor Press
 

A well presented guide to London's past and a treasure trove of information for historians, residents, medical professionals and tourists, Medical London charts the many roles that diseases, treatments and cures have played in the city's sprawling story. It also reveals how London, in turn, has shaped the professions and practices of modern medicine.

Reviews

The Financial Times

Leo Hollis

What they reveal is more than the expected symptoms of epidemics and quackery that have stalked the streets of the capital for centuries. They unveil a new and thrilling pathology – the city and the patient are one and the same: changing attitudes to disease have often influenced the city, while ideas about what the city is have guided the hand of the doctor by the bedside... Walking the city is a type of reading, and Burnett and Jay are excellent guides but their box of medical delights also contains a thorough and entertaining history of medicine in the metropolis.

20/12/2008

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The Observer

Will Hobson

"Nobody is healthy in London, nobody can be," Jane Austen wrote, and by tracing London's diseases through the centuries, Barnett and Jay have produced a wonderful history both of Londoners' lives and the medical profession. Best of all, they include maps for walks in the footsteps of Daniel Defoe (an 18th-century medical student) among the fleshpots of Soho and so forth.

21/12/2008

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