What They Teach You at Harvard Business School: My Two Years Inside the Cauldron of Capitalism

Philip Delves Broughton

What They Teach You at Harvard Business School: My Two Years Inside the Cauldron of Capitalism

When Philip Delves Broughton abandoned his career as a successful journalist and joined Harvard Business School's prestigious MBA course, he joined 900 other would-be tycoons in a cauldron of capitalism. Two years of taxing case studies and excel shortcuts lay ahead of him, but he couldn't have told you what OCRA was, other than a vegetable, or whether discount department stores make more money than airlines. He did, however, know that Harvard Business School's alumni appeared to be taking over the world. The US president, the president of the World Bank, the US treasury secretary, the CEOs of General Electric, Goldman Sachs and Proctor & Gamble - all were bringing HBS experience to the way they ran their banks, businesses and even countries. And with the prospect of economic enlightenment before him, he decided to see for himself exactly what they teach you at Harvard Business School. Two years and 500 case studies later, he had met the worlds' most influential entrepreneurs and analysed the biggest business conundrums. But he and his fellow students faced a bigger question still - how would they juggle their lives, their jobs and their bank balances? 4.4 out of 5 based on 4 reviews
What They Teach You at Harvard Business School: My Two Years Inside the Cauldron of Capitalism

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Business, Finance & Law, Reference, Humour
Format Paperback
Pages 304
RRP £12.99
Date of Publication August 2008
ISBN 978-0670917761
Publisher Viking
 

When Philip Delves Broughton abandoned his career as a successful journalist and joined Harvard Business School's prestigious MBA course, he joined 900 other would-be tycoons in a cauldron of capitalism. Two years of taxing case studies and excel shortcuts lay ahead of him, but he couldn't have told you what OCRA was, other than a vegetable, or whether discount department stores make more money than airlines. He did, however, know that Harvard Business School's alumni appeared to be taking over the world. The US president, the president of the World Bank, the US treasury secretary, the CEOs of General Electric, Goldman Sachs and Proctor & Gamble - all were bringing HBS experience to the way they ran their banks, businesses and even countries. And with the prospect of economic enlightenment before him, he decided to see for himself exactly what they teach you at Harvard Business School. Two years and 500 case studies later, he had met the worlds' most influential entrepreneurs and analysed the biggest business conundrums. But he and his fellow students faced a bigger question still - how would they juggle their lives, their jobs and their bank balances?

Reviews

Scotland on Sunday

Chris Blackhurst

[A] searingly funny account... In the main, it's the arrogance and pomposity of the place that sees itself as the world's No 1 that provokes laughter.

31/08/2008

Read Full Review


The Times

Robert Cole

Broughton... sketches out the Harvard curriculum and his fellow travellers with skill and wit.... [His] work is a handy introduction for those who crave the mega-bucks and mega-power that HBS brings many of its graduates. But while it is not the kind of book that non-business readers will naturally reach for, it deserves a broader audience.

31/07/2008

Read Full Review


The Sunday Times

Christopher Hart

The result of Delves Broughton’s time [at Harvard Business School] is this funny and revealing insider’s view, revealing precisely because he is genuinely fascinated by the world of business, and his fascination is infectious.

03/08/2008

Read Full Review


The Economist

The Economist

"Mr Delves Broughton did not set out to write a book about the course. Nor is this probably the book that HBS would choose to mark its 100th birthday... Yet anyone considering enrolling will find this an insightful portrait of HBS life, with detailed accounts of case studies and slightly forced classroom fun, such as the students on the back row—the “skydecks”—who rate the performance of their peers. (“HBS had two modes, deadly serious and frat boy.”)"

15/04/2009

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore