Moon

Moon

It is the near future. Astronaut Sam Bell is living on the far side of the moon, completing a three-year contract with Lunar Industries to mine Earth’s primary source of energy, Helium-3. It is a lonely job, made harder by a broken satellite that allows no live communications home. Taped messages are all Sam can send and receive. Thankfully, his time on the moon is nearly over, and Sam will be reunited with his wife, Tess, and their three-year-old daughter, Eve, in only a few short weeks… Suddenly, Sam’s health starts to deteriorate. Painful headaches, hallucinations and a lack of focus lead to an almost fatal accident on a routine drive on the moon in a lunar rover. While recuperating back at the base (with no memory of how he got there), Sam meets a younger, angrier version of himself, who claims to be there to fulfill the same three year contract Sam started all those years ago. Confined with what appears to be a clone of his earlier self, and with a “support crew” on its way to help put the base back into productive order, Sam is fighting the clock to discover what’s going on and where he fits into company plans. 3.2 out of 5 based on 9 reviews
Moon

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Horror / Suspense
Director Duncan Jones
Cast Robin Chalk, Dominique McElligott, Sam Rockwell, Kaya Scodelario, Kevin Spacey Matt Berry
Studio Sony Pictures UK
Release Date July 2009
Running Time 97 minutes
 

It is the near future. Astronaut Sam Bell is living on the far side of the moon, completing a three-year contract with Lunar Industries to mine Earth’s primary source of energy, Helium-3. It is a lonely job, made harder by a broken satellite that allows no live communications home. Taped messages are all Sam can send and receive. Thankfully, his time on the moon is nearly over, and Sam will be reunited with his wife, Tess, and their three-year-old daughter, Eve, in only a few short weeks… Suddenly, Sam’s health starts to deteriorate. Painful headaches, hallucinations and a lack of focus lead to an almost fatal accident on a routine drive on the moon in a lunar rover. While recuperating back at the base (with no memory of how he got there), Sam meets a younger, angrier version of himself, who claims to be there to fulfill the same three year contract Sam started all those years ago. Confined with what appears to be a clone of his earlier self, and with a “support crew” on its way to help put the base back into productive order, Sam is fighting the clock to discover what’s going on and where he fits into company plans.

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Reviews

The Mirror

Mark Adams

a top-notch film that is engrossing, intriguing and intelligent.

07/12/2009

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The Observer

Philip French

A gripping, thoughtful, extremely claustrophobic movie, its director Duncan Jones, is a onetime graduate student of philosophy. Moreover, he was once known as Zowie Bowie and is the son of David Bowie, no stranger to the world of outer space.

19/07/2009

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The Times

Wendy Ide

With its measured pacing, melancholy tone and eye for prosaic details, Moon is very different from the glossy sci-fi blockbuster — and far more satisfying.

16/07/2009

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Time Out

Dave Calhoun

The film is not entirely logical, but it raises pleasing questions and looks beautiful.

16/07/2009

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Empire Magazine

Simon Crook

Shot in 33 days and working miracles with a $5 million budget, it’s a Sundance movie in outer space and a relief it escaped the studio black hole. Moon asks proper big, stimulating questions about what it means to be human, without being cold, aloof, poncy or even remotely boring. It also looks, in its own wonderfully Airfixy way, fantastic. If you like brainfood served with your eye candy, take the trip.

19/07/2009

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

The strength of Moon is also, paradoxically, its weakness: its evocation of loneliness and the vast, silent reaches of outer space. Sam's daily routine is fascinating: three years, three whole years, doing nothing but that. But for the drama to advance, you need Sam to interact with someone - someone apart from a disloyal and mutinous computer, that is - and here is where the weakness lies.

17/07/2009

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

The plot's denouement is probably the least satisfying aspect of the film, though in its insistent focus upon a single actor it scores a bull's-eye for daring.

17/07/2009

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The Daily Mail

Chris Tookey

Its target (corporate greed) may be a little too familiar, and the pace is slack in the middle, but the atmosphere of creeping paranoia held me gripped.

16/07/2009

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The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

Moon, starring Sam Rockwell as a crisis-torn lunar colonist, was directed by David Bowie’s son Duncan Jones. Psychedelic sci-fi? Glam rock goes off-world? No: wordy and overwrought like a radio play in space.

15/07/2009

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