4.3.2.1.

4.3.2.1.

From the BAFTA winning British Actor/ Writer/ Director. Noel Clarke comes 4.3.2.1, a sexy, gripping thriller following three days in the lives of four very different girls. Starring some of Britain and America’s most exciting rising stars including Emma Roberts (Nancy Drew, Wild Child), Tamsin Egerton (St. Trinian’s), Ophelia Lovibond (Nowhere Boy, London Boulevard) and Shanika Warren-Markland (Adulthood), the four intricately woven stories are about four best friends who become involved in a major diamond heist.--©Official Site 1.6 out of 5 based on 7 reviews
4.3.2.1.

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Thriller
Director Noel Clarke and Mark Davis
Cast Tamsin Egerton, Ophelia Lovibond, Shanika Warren-Markland, Noel Clarke Emma Roberts
Studio The Works
Release Date May 2010
Running Time 117 mins
 

From the BAFTA winning British Actor/ Writer/ Director. Noel Clarke comes 4.3.2.1, a sexy, gripping thriller following three days in the lives of four very different girls. Starring some of Britain and America’s most exciting rising stars including Emma Roberts (Nancy Drew, Wild Child), Tamsin Egerton (St. Trinian’s), Ophelia Lovibond (Nowhere Boy, London Boulevard) and Shanika Warren-Markland (Adulthood), the four intricately woven stories are about four best friends who become involved in a major diamond heist.--©Official Site

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Reviews

Time Out

Cath Clarke

Still, jammed as it is with teen sex and misbehaving, and with a plotline that hinges on a packet of Pringles, if you’re over 21 you’re probably too old to be watching.

03/06/2010

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The Times

Wendy Ide

It’s like a Sex and the City wank fantasy as envisioned by a 13-year-old comic-book nerd. It’s so cartoonish that it makes The Flintstones look like a work of unvarnished neo-realism... t’s not great cinema, by any stretch of the imagination, nor is it intended to be. This is energetic, pulpy exploitation from the UK that might just claim back a small corner of the multiplex audience from the relentless onslaught of cynical Hollywood garbage.

28/05/2010

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

This film whooshes wildly all over the place, and it's got plenty of energy, but nothing about it is convincing for a single moment, and the acting is on the torpid side.

27/05/2010

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The Independent on Sunday

John Walsh

In Empire magazine, Clarke bumptiously nominates Alejandro Inarritu's magnificent debut feature, Amores Perros, as the kind of film he was thinking to emulate. Of 4.3.2.1. he says, "It's told in a bit of an off-kilter way, which I don't think is done much in this country." Yes it is, Noel. It's done in a hundred thousand music videos that involve guns, babes and lots of empty posturing. We'd expected something a bit different. You get me?

30/05/2010

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

The film flits from London to New York and back, marking a tale of "2" cities that has ambition to spare but not a lot of tautness in the writing. A white man, having offended a crew of black New Yorkers, tries desperately to save himself: "Please – I voted for Obama!" That's the film's "1" good joke.

28/05/2010

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The Observer

Philip French

It's rather like an underwear advertisement with aspirations to be a British version of Kubrick's The Killing and does little to enhance the reputation of its co-director and co-star Noel Clarke.

30/05/2010

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The Daily Mail

Chris Tookey

Worst film of the week, and potentially the year, is this laughably over-ambitious, unconsciously sexist attempt by aspiring writer/director/ actor Noel Clarke (still most famous as Billie Piper's boyfriend in Doctor Who) to combine a Tarantino-esque heist picture with a feminist buddy movie.

28/05/2010

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