Let Me In

Let Me In

An alienated 12-year-old boy befriends a mysterious young newcomer to his small New Mexico town, and discovers an unconventional path to adulthood in Let Me In.--©Official Site 3.4 out of 5 based on 14 reviews
Let Me In

Omniscore:

Certificate 15
Genre Horror / Suspense, Sci-Fi / Fantasy
Director Matt Reeves
Cast Chloe Moretz, Richard Jenkins, Cara Buono, Elias Koteas Kodi Smit-McPhee
Studio Icon Film
Release Date November 2010
Running Time 115 mins
 

An alienated 12-year-old boy befriends a mysterious young newcomer to his small New Mexico town, and discovers an unconventional path to adulthood in Let Me In.--©Official Site

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The Omnivore recommends: Let the Right One In

Reviews

Empire Magazine

Dan Jolin

Not as deep as the original, but certainly more of a crowdpleaser — and it’s hard to imagine a more intelligent and well-crafted American horror being released this year.

08/11/2010

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The New York Times

A. O Scott

The story holds a few surprises, but what makes “Let Me In” so eerily fascinating is the mood it creates. It is at once artful and unpretentious, more interested in intimacy and implication than in easy scares or slick effects.

01/10/2010

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The Observer

Philip French

This rather good, extremely well performed horror movie is a transposition of Tomas Alfredson's outstanding Swedish vampire movie, Let the Right One In, from 1982 Stockholm to President Reagan's America, and specifically Los Alamos, Mexico, cradle of the atom bomb.

07/11/2010

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Time Out

David Jenkins

Some members of the horror cognoscenti have not been charmed by this new version, but I felt this film trumped the original in a number of ways, notably by tapping in to deeper and more obscure emotions concerning the ways in which a child would interpret romantic attraction.

04/11/2010

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The Times

Wendy Ide

This remake is, perhaps, a little more emotionally accessible than the Swedish version, but it lacks some of its dark, deadpan humour. Did it need to be made? Probably not, but whatever your feelings on English-language remakes of perfectly serviceable foreign-language pictures, this is an impressive piece of film-making.

05/11/2010

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The Sunday Times

Cosmo Landesman

Is Let Me In better than Let the Right One In? Not better, just different. Reeves has taken all the best things about the original and simply turned up the volume, slightly, on the human drama and the elements of horror. He has managed to be respectful of the Swedish original while creating an American film that works in its own right.  

07/11/2010

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Total Film

Jonathan Crocker

If we hadn’t already seen it in Swedish, we’d probably be talking up Reeves’ dark, gripping vampire remake – and its two lead performances – as something rather special. Actually, we’re going to do that anyway.

26/10/2010

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Variety

Peter Debruge

Matt Reeves hasn't ruined the elegant Swedish vampire story by remaking it. If anything, he's made some improvements, including the addition of a tense action-horror sequence in the middle of the film. While all that is artful about "Let Me In" comes straight from the original, the Hollywood version commands respect for not dumbing things down, offering classy, "Sixth Sense"-style crossover potential...

11/09/2010

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The Independent on Sunday

Nicholas Barber

The paradox is that this fidelity to the Swedish film is what makes it so good – but also so missable. On the one hand, it's an intriguing horror drama that's recommended if you didn't catch Let the Right One In. On the other hand, some of us have literally seen it all before. What's really galling is that Reeves is too talented to be wasting his time on pointless exercises. I spent most of Let Me In enjoying the film he'd made, and wishing he'd made a different one.

07/11/2010

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

A very good film, slightly overpraised, has been remade as a slightly good film, very overpraised. Tomas Alfredson's cult Swedish romance Let the Right One In from 2008, about a bullied boy who falls in love with the undead tweenage girl next door, has been repackaged as a Hollywood indie directed by Matt Reeves, marketed at an audience who are keen to get a load of the hip new vampire scene, but obviously turn their discerning noses up at the Twilight franchise.

04/11/2010

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

The writer-director Matt Reeves (Cloverfield) conjures a suggestive atmosphere of dread, and uses his two adolescent leads superbly, but the shock of the original can't be duplicated, and certainly not improved on by more explicit vampiric assaults.

05/11/2010

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The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

A little league Twilight... This remake by Matt Cloverfield Reeves misses almost everything. The lemony pallor seems out of Paintbox. The spookiness is supplied by make-up. The sombre, melancholy mood seems done with an applicator: a large swab of slow-tempo gloom in which the action high-points – the blood-draining murder in the park, the girl vampire’s savaging of a nocturnal pedestrian – are presented with mechanised flairlessness.

03/11/2010

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The Daily Mail

Chris Tookey

You’d do far better to track down the original Swedish version on DVD. It is slower, but much more original, and infinitely more moving.

05/11/2010

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The Daily Telegraph

Sukhdev Sandhu

The violence is more graphic, the depiction of female flesh less explicit. The performances are perfectly serviceable, but the child actors look exactly that: child actors who you feel you’ve seen on advertisements for peanut butter. What’s missing is the alluring otherness of Let the Right One In. That film’s brittle textures and haunted ambience seemed in some strange way to have sprung organically from the nation in which it was set. This remake, by contrast, smells of boardrooms and calculating machines.

04/11/2010

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