Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights

A Yorkshire hill farmer on a visit to Liverpool finds a homeless boy on the streets. He takes him home to live as part of his family on the isolated Yorkshire moors where the boy forges an obsessive relationship with the farmer’s daughter. 3.3 out of 5 based on 13 reviews
Wuthering Heights

Omniscore:

Certificate 15
Genre Drama, Romance
Director Andrea Arnold
Cast James Howson, Shannon Beer, Solomon Glave Kaya Scodelario
Studio Artificial Eye
Release Date November 2011
Running Time 120 mins
 

A Yorkshire hill farmer on a visit to Liverpool finds a homeless boy on the streets. He takes him home to live as part of his family on the isolated Yorkshire moors where the boy forges an obsessive relationship with the farmer’s daughter.

Reviews

The Daily Telegraph

Robbie Collin

Strange, profane and flecked with rime and spittle. It feels, in the best way possible, totally alien.

10/11/2011

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Time Out

Dave Calhoun

This silence and the intimate cosying-up to Heathcliff becomes a slight problem in the film’s later stages. Here, older Heathcliff and Cathy are not as interesting as their younger selves – and nor are the actors playing them. Howson looks lost and Scodelario is a thin presence.

07/11/2011

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The Times

Kate Muir

This risky adaptation will not please the popcorn audience. It demands too much time and concentration, and the second half is flawed. But for its wildly irreverent reboot of a great work of literature, and Ryan’s glorious photography, Wuthering Heights deserves your respect, gentlemen.

11/11/2011

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

In the most extraordinary way, Arnold achieves a kind of pre-literary reality effect. Her film is not presented as another layer of interpretation, superimposed on a classic's frills and those of all the other remembered versions, but an attempt to create something that might have existed before the book ... That is an illusion, of course, but a convincing and thrilling one.

10/11/2011

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

You can tell from the first minutes that this wants to honour the wildness of Brontë's vision; by the end you admire the way it tries to honour the mystery. What has happened between the story's young couple seems less a romance than a negative of a romance, where love has been transfigured into something masochistic, thwarted, and brutal.

11/11/2011

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The Scotsman

Alistair Harkness

[The film] deserves a lot of credit for approaching sacred source material in such a radical form. Refusing to conform to the stately conventions of British period drama ... Arnold deconstructs Emily Brontë’s classic story of thwarted, forbidden love...

11/11/2011

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The Observer

Philip French

The movie is at its strongest in [the] early scenes as Cathy and Heathcliff form a childhood bond against the bitter world and become one with each other in the natural world ... This is helped by the excellent naturalistic handheld camerawork of Arnold's regular cameraman, Robbie Ryan, and a remarkable soundtrack designed by Nicolas Becker.

13/11/2011

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The Sunday Times

Cosmo Landesman

[A] raw, rude and realistic adaptation.

13/11/2011

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The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

Arnold ... has every right to perform a “literectomy”: filleting a novel of the unfilmable, going for the feral through the photogenic. But in this movie there is too much photogenic, too little feral and, sadly, no Heathcliff worthy of the name.

10/11/2011

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Empire Magazine

Helen O'Hara

Andrea Arnold, nothing if not committed to realism in low-key ... goes back to the novel and places the emphasis firmly on the strangeness of Emily Brontë’s story, emphasising not its oft-claimed love story but the strange nature of the bond between Heathcliff and Cathy.

07/11/2011

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The New Statesman

Ryan Gilbey

Get the weather and the landscape right in Wuthering Heights and you are practically home and dry. Or wet. Lash goes the rain. Crash goes the barn door. Howl goes the wind, moaning and mith­ering like a god with toothache. Perhaps the wind is complaining that the film is only half an adaptation, not a Brontësaurus but a Brontë sawn in two.

14/11/2011

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The Evening Standard

David Sexton

Fortunately, Arnold's Wuthering Heights is not principally driven by the acting but by its style of filming. It's all deliberately rough. The soundtrack is full of wind and rain, heard blowing hard against the microphone.

11/11/2011

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The Daily Mail

Chris Tookey

A would-be sophisticated but actually naive attempt to turn Emily Bronte’s fascinating, emotionally involving romantic melodrama into the most alienating kind of brutalism.

11/11/2011

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