Hugo

Hugo

Hugo is the astonishing adventure of a wily and resourceful orphan boy whose quest to unlock a secret left to him by his father will transform Hugo and all those around him. 3.6 out of 5 based on 19 reviews
Hugo

Omniscore:

Certificate PG
Genre Adventure, Drama, Family
Director Martin Scorsese
Cast Chloe Moretz, Christopher Lee, Jude Law, Sacha Baron Cohen, Ben Kingsley Asa Butterfield
Studio Entertainment UK
Release Date December 2011
Running Time 127 mins
 

Hugo is the astonishing adventure of a wily and resourceful orphan boy whose quest to unlock a secret left to him by his father will transform Hugo and all those around him.

Reviews

Empire Magazine

Kim Newman

The movie is assembled with an obsessive delight in a combination of magic and mechanics, which unites his young and old heroes, a stage conjurer-turned-filmmaker and a lad with an inherited knack for fixing clockwork contraptions.

28/11/2011

Read Full Review


The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

A delirium that delights and excites.

01/12/2011

Read Full Review


The Scotsman

Siobhan Synnot

It makes Avatar look like an Etch A Sketch.

28/11/2011

Read Full Review


The Daily Mail

Chris Tookey

The film has terrific strengths. Unlike most 3D movies, Hugo was shot using 3D not as a money-making gimmick but as a storytelling device, to add height, depth, humour and intensity. Another virtue is that the picture shows a fascination with early cinema that's joyful and infectious.

02/12/2011

Read Full Review


The New Yorker

David Denby

A fantasy of the mechanical world ... No other work of art has demonstrated so explicitly how gears, springs, shutters, wheels, and tracks can generate wonders.

28/11/2011

Read Full Review


The New York Times

Manohla Dargis

Hugo is specifically about those observers of life who, perhaps out of loneliness and with desire, explore reality through its moving images, which is why it’s also about the creation of a cinematic imagination — Hugo’s, Méliès’s, Mr. Scorsese’s, ours.

22/11/2011

Read Full Review


Time Magazine

Richard Corliss

Hugo is more than a love letter to film preservation, a charitable donation to movie lovers, critics included. It is a fable as sensitive and powerful as any Scorsese film since The Age of Innocence nearly two decades ago.

22/11/2011

Read Full Review


Time Out

Cath Clarke

It's all a little too patchy to be truly great and the story splutters along in places, but ‘Hugo’s quixotic faith in movies is intoxicating.

28/11/2011

Read Full Review


The Times

Kate Muir

Has [Scorsese] gone soft with his first children’s film? Well, yes, but his skills are as honed as ever, and he demonstrates that cinema is a magic box of tricks, then and now.

02/12/2011

Read Full Review


The Observer

Philip French

An imaginative history lesson in the form of a detective story.

04/12/2011

Read Full Review


Total Film

Rob James

There’s something truly perfect and poignant about using cinema’s breakthrough 3D technology to reach back into its past - and Scorsese revels in it.

28/11/2011

Read Full Review


The Sunday Times

Cosmo Landesman

It’s a bit rich of Scorsese, of all directors, to bang on about the magic and the enchantment, given that his career and reputation were founded on bringing a raw new realism to the cinema. Never mind. Film buffs will be in heaven — as their poor children sit in the darkness, bored rigid by Uncle Marty’s overlong lecture.

04/12/2011

Read Full Review


The Los Angeles Times

Kenneth Turan

Given how inescapably bloody and violent so many of Scorsese's past films have been, it's something of an upset that "Hugo" is effective at all. The book Scorsese chose to adapt is out of the ordinary all by itself.

23/11/2011

Read Full Review


The New Statesman

Daniel Trilling

There is too much breathless talk of having an "adventure" and cinema being a "special place", a place "where dreams are made". Are dreams really made by the movie business, like so many cars rolling off a production line?

01/12/2011

Read Full Review


The Daily Telegraph

Robbie Collin

For all its worthy intentions and technical brilliance, Hugo is a hard film to love: not only for children, who may find the largely immobile plot a slog, but also to viewers of any age who’d rather be charmed than merely wowed.

01/12/2011

Read Full Review


The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

A hi-tech magic lantern presentation on the wonder of early cinema, and its origins in the world of clockwork craftsmanship: toys, games, illusions.

01/12/2011

Read Full Review


The Evening Standard

David Sexton

Scorsese's great films feel dangerous, fevered, hallucinatory. These days he seems wholly conservative, primarily keen on restoration. Hugo is cinema shining a light reverently up its own fundament. It's hard to know which generation this family film can truly entertain. Not the kids, I suspect. Grandpa, perhaps.

02/12/2011

Read Full Review


The Independent

Anthony Quinn

There is nothing wrong with Scorsese wanting to celebrate cinema's first cracklings of genius, and his recreation of bravura moments ... goes deep into his own obsessive love of movie ingenuity. But it is mismatched to a tame and synthetic family-based confection that moves at a slouch and provokes nothing like the pathos intended.

02/12/2011

Read Full Review


The Independent on Sunday

Jonathan Romney

Seriously, who ever thought that Martin Scorsese would stoop to getting a comic reaction shot from a doberman?

04/12/2011

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore