Hadewijch

Hadewijch

Named after a thirteenth-century mystic, Hadewijch presents the spiritual journey of Céline, a young novice nun who is expelled because of her overzealous faith, and sent back into the world by the mother superior ... She meets Yassine, an Arab boy who introduces her to the lights of Paris, and the cités. Céline’s passionate love of God, her rage, her unease with her haute-bourgeois parents, and her encounter with the volatile Yassine and more importantly his brother Nassir, a devout Muslim, leads her between grace and madness, further off along dangerous paths. 2.8 out of 5 based on 12 reviews
Hadewijch

Omniscore:

Certificate 12A
Genre Drama
Director Bruno Dumont
Cast Yassine Salime, Karl Sarafidis, David Dewaele Julie Sokolowski
Studio New Wave Films
Release Date February 2012
Running Time 105 mins
 

Named after a thirteenth-century mystic, Hadewijch presents the spiritual journey of Céline, a young novice nun who is expelled because of her overzealous faith, and sent back into the world by the mother superior ... She meets Yassine, an Arab boy who introduces her to the lights of Paris, and the cités. Céline’s passionate love of God, her rage, her unease with her haute-bourgeois parents, and her encounter with the volatile Yassine and more importantly his brother Nassir, a devout Muslim, leads her between grace and madness, further off along dangerous paths.

Reviews

The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

Genuinely mysterious and unsettling, with a batsqueak of dreamlike strangeness in the realist setting.

16/02/2012

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Total Film

Tom Dawson

Dumont continues to plough his own furrow with this provocative look at contemporary religious martyrdom.

06/02/2012

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The Times

Wendy Ide

An austere and beautiful exploration of the conflicts inherent in religious faith.

17/02/2012

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

Whatever else he is – avant-gardiste, provocateur, largely unknown – Bruno Dumont is a wonderful observer of the human face.

17/02/2012

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Empire Magazine

David Parkinson

Even though the central conceit seems flawed, there is no denying the power of this comparison of Christian and Islamic concepts of love.

13/02/2012

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The Evening Standard

Charlotte O'Sullivan

Get thee to a convent, Bruno. You're not ready for the real world.

17/02/2012

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The New York Times

Stephen Holden

This cosmic view of humanity is so harsh and penetrating that it allows for little if any humor. And viewers who are not on Mr. Dumont’s wavelength tend to dismiss his work as pretentious, glum and boring. Those who follow him, however, will find themselves in the rarefied territory of Ingmar Bergman, Robert Bresson and Carl Dreyer.

23/12/2011

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The Observer

Philip French

As stiff as an over-starched wimple and rather tedious, but like earlier films of his it has something that sticks in the mind like the hook in a fish's mouth.

19/02/2012

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The Daily Telegraph

David Gritten

Mostly Frustrating

17/02/2012

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Time Out

Wally Hammond

The girl ... is played by non-professional actress Julie Sokolowski who, with her eyes raised, can repeat the feat made famous by the silent actress Falconetti of making spiritual anguish look uncannily identical to sexual ecstasy.

14/02/2012

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The New Yorker

Richard Brody

Dumont suppresses any information that could bring any of his stick-figure characters to life; he seems to be offering lessons about fanaticism, wealth, power, poverty, and politics, but is merely drawing connections by numbers.

17/02/2012

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

Dumont makes things even more mysterious by withholding significant facts. Arguments could be made in defence of this strategy, but I suspect they would be dry and laborious. They certainly wouldn’t improve the experience of watching this pretentious film.

19/02/2012

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