This Means War

This Means War

Two of the world’s top secret agents are best friends who never let anything come between them -- until they inadvertently fall for the same woman. It’s all-out war, as the two spies battle each other with high-tech surveillance, advanced tactics, and an arsenal capable of bringing down a small country. 1.7 out of 5 based on 18 reviews
This Means War

Omniscore:

Certificate 12A
Genre Action, Romance, Comedy
Director McG
Cast Chris Pine, Tom Hardy, Abigail Spencer, Laura Vandervoort, Reese Witherspoon
Studio Fox UK
Release Date March 2012
Running Time 98 mins
 

Two of the world’s top secret agents are best friends who never let anything come between them -- until they inadvertently fall for the same woman. It’s all-out war, as the two spies battle each other with high-tech surveillance, advanced tactics, and an arsenal capable of bringing down a small country.

Reviews

Channel 4 Film

Terry Mulcahy

The double-standards are so painfully entrenched into the gender politics of This Means War that it almost derails the film in a pivotal scene towards the end, but it's probably best to accept the terms of the playing field and just go with it.

02/03/2012

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Empire Magazine

Helen O'Hara

While the final result of all this is as slick and shiny as Hollywood can make it, the chemistry between all three leads makes this a likable and frothy confection that’s closer in tone to director McG’s TV successes — Chuck especially — than his recent cinema outings. And that is a very good thing no matter what your sex.

27/02/2012

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The Los Angeles Times

Betsy Sharkey

If you are in the mood for action, there is a whole lot of it here. If you're in the mood for love, of the swooning, weak-in-the knees sort, there's not so much. But this is war after all, a bromance, not a romance, muscle, not mush. The relationship that truly sizzles — from the sentiment to the satire — is the one between FDR and Tuck, with Pine and Hardy pulling off one of the better bromances in recent memory.

14/02/2012

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Total Film

Emma Dibdin

Given co-scripter Simon Kinberg’s previous scribing gig on Sherlock Holmes, it’s not surprising how much pleasure lies in the central co-dependent friendship – although as with Holmes, it’s not so much the writing as the easy comedic chemistry between the leads that sells it. Pine and Hardy both seem to be having so much fun in their loose, improv-inflected scenes that it’s impossible not to have some yourself.

30/01/2012

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The Evening Standard

The Evening Standard

What we get is some smartish dialogue, stunts which at least attempt parodies of the spy genre and an ironic view of the eternal battle between men and women. What we don’t get is the feeling that the film progresses from its passable start towards a decent finish.

02/03/2012

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The New York Times

Manohla Dargis

For whatever reason, industry sages keep putting Ms. Witherspoon in romances, which is like putting a shark in a tank with a bobbing basket of kittens. She can be a fine actress and a brilliant comic, but she’s too calculating and self-contained a presence for most romances, particularly those comedies that try to squeeze laughs from female submission or humiliation. Ms. Witherspoon doesn’t register as the yielding type.

18/02/2012

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The Scotsman

Alistair Harkness

As chop-shopped premises go, it’s the sort of thing that might have had some mileage had it been bold enough to make the blatant homoerotic subtext of Tuck and FDR’s relationship literal. Hardy’s and Pine’s overly groomed smoothness would certainly have lent themselves to pushing things a bit further in this respect, particularly since neither of them generate much chemistry with Witherspoon.

01/03/2012

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Time Out

Tom Huddleston

Charm: we know it when we see it, but it’s impossible to manufacture. Buddy-action-romcom ‘This Means War’ tries so hard to be charming that it’s initially unsettling, then sort of sweet, and finally just pathetic. Which, considering the combined charisma of its cast, is something of an achievement in itself.

28/02/2012

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Screen

Brent Simon

The action “sizzle” arrives via occasional cheery blasts of brainless, bloodless, consequence-free shootouts, designed so as not to challenge or offend. In encouraging its audience to think so little, however, This Means War also diminishes to the point of negligible existence any care or investment about what unfolds on screen.

10/02/2012

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The New Yorker

Anthony Lane

Actually, this means nothing.

02/03/2012

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Time Magazine

Mary Pols

Technically, movies don’t give off a scent, but This Means War is so smarmy that it seems to reek of cheap cologne ... Directed by McG, [it] is lit like an advertisement for a cruise line, all harsh candy colors in daylight, various shades of neon at night and garish 24/7.

16/02/2012

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

A mixture of mediocre comedy, cut-price action and rigidly formulaic romantic scenes — all delivered, in this case, with crude flair, but also with a countervailing nastiness of spirit.

04/03/2012

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The Observer

Philip French

Can his films get worse? Take my word for it, or expose yourself to this comedy thriller.

04/03/2012

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The Independent on Sunday

Nicholas Barber

The film could have been a comment on 21st-century romance, with all its opportunities for paranoid cyber-snooping, but instead it just churns out repetitive scenes of Pine and Hardy sabotaging each other's dates, interspersed by repetitive scenes of Witherspoon whinging about how conflicted she is.

04/03/2012

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The Daily Telegraph

Robbie Collin

A film during which very bad things happen very often, and none of them are noticeably funnier than genital trauma brought on by an air rifle.

02/03/2012

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The Daily Mail

Chris Tookey

The film is offensively uncaring that the lads invade the heroine’s privacy, and misuse taxpayer-financed gadgetry and valuable CIA manpower to do so. These scenes are as tasteful and timely an idea as a romcom about a couple of intrusive Sun journalists falling in love with Charlotte Church

01/03/2012

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

A three-way masterclass in Not Funny and Not Sexy, a zero-chemistry triangle from McG, the director who gave us the screen version of Charlie's Angels 10 years ago and to which this must now be added on the charge sheet.

01/03/2012

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

The one really unpleasant surprise of the movie is Reese Witherspoon. Back in 1999 she starred in Election as Tracey Flick, one of the funniest, smartest and scariest anti-heroines in all cinema. Thirteen years later she's playing the perky stooge to a couple of jerks who can barely read their own tattoos. "What's the worst thing that can happen?" asks Lauren's girlfriend of her dating two guys at once. In career terms, Reese, this is the worst thing that can happen.

02/03/2012

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