Trishna

Trishna

Based on Thomas Hardy's classic novel Tess of the D’Ubervilles, Trishna is a beautifully shot, classic tale of love and tragedy set across modern day rural Rajasthan and the thriving metropolis of Mumbai. Trishna meets a wealthy young British businessman, Jay Singh, who has come to India to work in his father's hotel business. 3.1 out of 5 based on 16 reviews
Trishna

Omniscore:

Certificate 15
Genre Adaptation, Drama
Director Michael Winterbottom
Cast Riz Ahmed, Roshan Seth, Kalki Koechlin, Anurag Kashyap, Freida Pinto
Studio Artificial Eye
Release Date March 2012
Running Time 113 mins
 

Based on Thomas Hardy's classic novel Tess of the D’Ubervilles, Trishna is a beautifully shot, classic tale of love and tragedy set across modern day rural Rajasthan and the thriving metropolis of Mumbai. Trishna meets a wealthy young British businessman, Jay Singh, who has come to India to work in his father's hotel business.

Reviews

The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

I began to think: if only there were a space/time transfer window for movie casts. Pinto could grow old and play Judi Dench’s elegantly vapid character in Marigold. Dench could grow young and bring her passionate vulnerability and intensity of identification to a part that needs both. Dench isn’t Indian. But in cinema everything can be magicked, finessed or negotiated ...

08/03/2012

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The Independent

Geoffrey MacNab

We're a long way from Wessex but the transplanting of the tragic Hardy novel is surprisingly effective.

09/03/2012

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The Observer

Philip French

... compact, highly enjoyable ... [The] reworking has both its strengths and its weaknesses. On the one hand the original's complex texture is gravely weakened; on the other, the rambling narrative structure is transformed into a taut fable.

11/03/2012

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The Independent on Sunday

Nicholas Barber

Right on the boundary between fiction and documentary, Winterbottom's striking film retains the cruel sting of Hardy's plotting, but the improvised banter and the fly-on-the-wall footage of India's factories, beaches and dance classes give it a buzzing vibrancy you wouldn't find in a bonnets-and-breeches piece.

11/03/2012

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The Evening Standard

Charlotte O'Sullivan

We're supposed to be horrified as Jay's misogyny comes tumbling out of the closet and Trishna miserably submits, yet the camera's gaze feels both prurient and hackneyed. Just as crucially, since it's been made clear that Trishna has other options, her sudden act of rebellion (unlike Tess's) makes no sense. And Pinto - who is good at conveying reined-in passions - struggles with the change of gear.

24/10/2011

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Empire Magazine

David Hughes

Alas, Winterbottom’s loose style doesn’t complement the depths of Hardy’s tragic tale, and the decision to let the actors improvise dialogue was a disaster, not least due to the unfortunate blankness of Freida Pinto’s beautiful face.

05/03/2012

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The New Statesman

Ryan Gilbey

Readers of the novel will prepare themselves for an Angel to alleviate temporarily her suffering en route to tragedy. Now, how to put this gently? There is no Angel. Winterbottom's most radical adjustment, even more than switching period and continent, is to conflate Alec and Angel so that there is only Jay. The ramifications of this are extreme enough to risk disqualifying Trishna from the category of adaptation.

09/03/2012

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The Scotsman

Alistair Harkness

Those who know the story won’t be surprised at the trajectory things take; those who don’t may find Trishna too passive to fully engage with the film. But there is a real vibrancy to this telling of the story that makes the effort worthwhile.

09/03/2012

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The Daily Telegraph

Robbie Collin

Both Pinto and Ahmed are on fine form, and share a humid chemistry that gets increasingly clammy as the film progresses, but Winterbottom’s air-conditioned direction prevents us from ever feeling the heat. More fascinating is his vision of India ... Nature here is a primitive, almost sentient force: in some ways, we’re not so far from Hardy’s Wessex after all.

08/03/2012

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Time Out

Cath Clarke

Like a Hardy character, Trishna is compelling but flawed – perhaps fatally so, because all the emotion-crushing fierceness of the novel has been almost entirely lost en route to Rajasthan.

06/03/2012

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The Times

Kate Muir

By the end, the heavy-handed soundtrack turns Trishna into a musical about room service, as Pinto trots in and out with a tray and other offerings. The ending is ridiculously melodramatic.

09/03/2012

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Total Film

Neil Smith

Resembling at times a gloomier Slumdog, Winterbottom’s movie doesn’t hang together quite as well, requiring a transformation from Ahmed that the Four Lions actor battles to make credible. But given how many literary adaps bow down to their inspirations, it’s refreshing to see one find a route into the material that feels both respectfully faithful and daringly innovative.

27/02/2012

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

Initially, this couple’s story is a credible way for Winterbottom to explore modern India, which he does in zesty images, but the plot later becomes improbably extreme — not out of fidelity to Hardy, but in a way devised by the director.

11/03/2012

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Variety

Peter Debruge

The latter third of Trishna's tale feels heavy-handed in its attempts to orchestrate the desired emotional response. Sudden and brutal, the tragic story's climactic murder achieves what the helmer failed to do in The Killer Inside Me, shocking auds through sheer intensity.

11/09/2011

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

There is tragedy and violence, perhaps attributable to thwarted ambition ... Yet something prevents Ahmed and Pinto from expressing these emotions powerfully and satisfyingly enough, and Pinto never quite shows that her character is changed by what she has gone through. The story is rather shapeless, with little dramatic traction: it feels as if it could end at the one-hour mark or go on for another four.

08/03/2012

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The Daily Mail

Chris Tookey

An interesting contrast to The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, but while texture and local atmosphere are all very well, I wish Winterbottom had speeded up the plot and delved deeper into the characters.

09/03/2012

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