Headhunters

Headhunters

The charismatic Roger Brown, a successful corporate headhunter by day and prolific art thief by night, is lured into a dangerous game of cat and mouse when he goes after the biggest heist of his life. 3.7 out of 5 based on 14 reviews
Headhunters

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Action, Thriller
Director Morten Tyldum
Cast Aksel Hennie, Julie R. Ølgaard, Synnøve Macody Lund Cast: Nikolaj Coster-Waldau
Studio Momentum
Release Date April 2012
Running Time
 

The charismatic Roger Brown, a successful corporate headhunter by day and prolific art thief by night, is lured into a dangerous game of cat and mouse when he goes after the biggest heist of his life.

Reviews

The Independent on Sunday

Nicholas Barber

These opening scenes set up a slick, smug heist movie along the lines of The Thomas Crown Affair. But we, like Hennie, are in for a surprise. Coster-Waldau isn't all he seems, and Hennie is soon tangling with nano-technology, a military tracking expert, a pair of enormously corpulent policemen, and much more besides. By the time he's been dunked in the most disgusting toilet since Trainspotting, Headhunters has spiralled into an unhinged farce that smacks of Carl Hiaasen and the Coen brothers ... one of the most satisfying and original thrillers in years.

08/04/2012

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The Times

Kate Muir

The action romps along in a series of shocks that allow the viewer to ignore the absurdities of the plot. The main device is patently ridiculous, and the art heist/special forces connections are strained. But the movie never takes itself too seriously, and there’s pleasurable schadenfreude about watching a carefully coiffed man in a designer suit end up a ruined tramp.

06/04/2012

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The Sunday Times

Cosmo Landesman

It’s as unexpected as a slap in the face from a lover. It tickles your funny bone and plays with taboos. It’s violent, bloody, disgusting (in places) and clever. Also surreal and touching ... Though Headhunters is being compared to the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo films, it has none of Stieg Larsson’s right-on feminist piety. It’s not the kind of film that wins fancy festival prizes, either. But it’s the best thriller we’ve had in ages.  

08/04/2012

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The Observer

Philip French

Although inevitably indebted to American models, Headhunters is firmly rooted in the Scandinavian experience, and it moves with the speed of a demented lemming heading for the cliff-edge of a fjord.

08/04/2012

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Empire Magazine

Kim Newman

For a while, the film verges on becoming a ‘how to’ manual for those in these recessionary times considering a career in high-end burglary, full of fascinating tips about how to get away with it. Evidently, you shouldn’t waste too much time on getting a proper forgery to hang in place of the picture you’re stealing since a reasonable photocopy will pass muster in the dark long enough for you to make a getaway and dispose of the original on the black market.

02/04/2012

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The Evening Standard

The Evening Standard

The great virtue of both the book and the film is that, though Brown is clearly a cad, Nesbo and Tyldum allow us to have some sympathy with the smoothie Brown, despite the fact that he has a luxurious home, a beautiful wife and a nice mistress too. It’s probably because, when the wheel of fortune turns so thoroughly against him that he is nearly drowned in farm slurry, he becomes almost human.m. I’m not sure it does that, but it certainly does entertain.

05/04/2012

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Scotland on Sunday

Siobhan Synnot

There’s enough preposterousness to set off a Geiger counter – including a security guard who likes to spend his time running round the house shooting live ammo at his delighted Russian prostitute girlfriend, and a bathroom adventure that makes the lavatory scene in Trainspotting look like a wade through a glacier spring. However, Headhunters is such a fresh, compact, giddy delight, that I was happy to go along with it.

01/04/2012

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Time Out

Tom Huddleston

While Nesbø and Tyldum’s prime directive is to give their audience a good bracing shake, they also find time to throw in a few witty, thoughtful asides about personal responsibility and the ways in which the relentless pursuit of wealth conflict with the achievement of true happiness. Bankers and business types may prickle at their blanket portrayal as greedy, self-serving misanthropes, but it serves to slot the film neatly within the current anti-capitalist zeitgeist.

05/04/2012

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Total Film

Matt Glasby

Crucially, the hurtling action rarely falters and never undermines the characters. And, as screenwriters will tell you, that’s the holy grail.

26/03/2012

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The Daily Mail

Chris Tookey

Many Scandinavian thrillers are dour; this one has a welcome, mischievous sense of humour.

05/04/2012

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Screen

Dan Fainaru

Realism is not high on the agenda here, with Tyldum diverting the plot in a number of directions and providing a shock a minute. The film’s main objective is to race ahead at top speed, starting in a light playful mood and gradually twisting the screws towards something akin to horror.

05/08/2011

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The Daily Telegraph

Tim Robey

Hennie’s performance works jolly hard to win our last-ditch sympathies, but the movie’s cold outlandishness — wickedly funny, at times — makes us feel like willing dupes in a con game.

05/04/2012

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

Is Nesbo offering up Roger as an emblem of corporate wickedness getting its comeuppance? If so, he has not spared the rod. Director Morten Tyldum has put together a tough little package of crime and punishment, then dragged it through an ordeal of grotesquerie that makes you wonder if the punishment hasn't eclipsed the crime altogether.

06/04/2012

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The Guardian

Paul MacInnes

The film doesn't merit chinstroking: it's stuffed with Troma-style riffs around schlock, gore and human effluvia, bookended by Shallow Grave-like sections full of cynical machinations. The parts barely relate, never mind work together.

05/04/2012

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