All In Good Time

All In Good Time

Atul and Vina are celebrating their marriage. However, a honeymoon spent with his parents was not part of their plans. Thoughtless patriarch Eeshwar seems determined to emasculate and embarrass his son. As the weeks pass, consummating their union becomes an impossibility that threatens the couples entire future. 2.6 out of 5 based on 13 reviews
All In Good Time

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Drama
Director Nigel Cole
Cast Reece Ritchie, Meera Syal, Harish Patel, Arsher Ali, Amara Karan
Studio Studio Canal
Release Date May 2012
Running Time
 

Atul and Vina are celebrating their marriage. However, a honeymoon spent with his parents was not part of their plans. Thoughtless patriarch Eeshwar seems determined to emasculate and embarrass his son. As the weeks pass, consummating their union becomes an impossibility that threatens the couples entire future.

Reviews

The Guardian

Anna Smith

While Ritchie and Karan offer up charming performances, their characters could use more depth: the romantic complications feel sudden without much psychological insight.

10/05/2012

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The Observer

Philip French

we realise that we've entered, if only briefly, the world of Tennessee Williams. Failed marriages and the inability to consummate are major elements of Period of Adjustment, A Streetcar Named Desire and especially Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, which has a striking resemblance to All in Good Time.

13/05/2012

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Total Film

Kate Stables

Its stagey mix of East Is East-style father/ son conflict and bouncy bedroom farce is endearing, though a tad stereotyped.

04/05/2012

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Empire Magazine

Olly Richards

Performances are appealing, particularly from Harish Patel as the overbearing but lonely father, but its central premise is rather a theatrical conceit. While it’s just about understandable that a young man might be so consumed by strained family relationships that he can’t concentrate on his wife in bed, it’s a push to believe that a few days without conjugals would lead a previously adoring couple to consider separation.

08/05/2012

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The Daily Mail

Chris Tookey

Sadly, the comic observation of Asian Britain is nowhere near as funny or gripping as in East Is East, and the plot feels too thin to sustain a feature film. The ending is especially rushed and unconvincing. Writer and director needed to dig deeper into the characters and explore the wider social implications.

11/05/2012

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The Daily Telegraph

David Gritten

Follows the tradition of plain, old-fashioned, knowingly warm-hearted British films that appeal to our sense of community and stir our feelings for little people. The Full Monty, East is East, Calendar Girls and Made in Dagenham all achieved their success through juxtapositions: of comedy and drama, tears and laughter, setbacks and eventual triumph.

11/05/2012

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Time Out

Trevor Johnston

Strangely, all [the] problems were evident in Khan-Din’s source material: ‘Alfie’ scribe Bill Naughton’s original 1963 play ‘All in Good Time’ ... A lack of generosity in properly acknowledging Naughton’s contribution is one issue, but couldn’t the material’s second screen incarnation have gone one better with the adaptation? Maybe it’s not a question to concern most viewers, yet, knowing the background, it’s hard not to feel that this could have been a whole lot better.

10/05/2012

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The Times

Kate Muir

The story — posh v working- class parents, nosey neighbours, a couple crushed — never quite escapes its old-fashioned theatrical confines, and raised only a few, weak laughs.

11/05/2012

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Scotland on Sunday

Siobhan Synnot

Crummy, contrived and apparently endless.

06/05/2012

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The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

The film ... loudly dins at us the new-look immigrant Indianness as if banging a gong. Subtlety was never the strong suit of director Nigel Cole. The cast, largely straight from the stage, project their dialogue as if no one has told them to stop playing to the gallery and start playing to the multiplex.

10/05/2012

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

Impossible not to be charmed by the opening setpiece – broad Lancashire accents amid the exotic plumage of Indian wedding wear – but thereafter the writing is patchy at best, its antagonisms predictable and its reconciliations way too pat.

11/05/2012

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

it’s energetically performed ... but the speed at which the drama escalates is hard to credit when the setting, a terraced house in Bolton, lacks a proscenium arch.

13/05/2012

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The Independent on Sunday

Nicholas Barber

It's [also] an extremely thin idea from which to hang an entire film. Khan-Din and Cole could have bulked it up by developing Ritchie and Karan's personalities, or by surrounding them with a fascinating supporting cast, but every character is two-dimensional, at most, and the dialogue is as flat as a chapati, even though Khan-Din adapted the screenplay from his own hit play, Rafta Rafta. As a result, All In Good Time moves so slowly that the title starts to seem ironic.

13/05/2012

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