2 Days in New York

2 Days in New York

Marion has broken up with Jack and now lives in New York with their child. But when her family decides to come visit her, she's unaware that the different cultural background held by her new American boyfriend Mingus, her eccentric father, and her sister Rose who decided to bring her ex-boyfriend along for the trip, added to her upcoming photo exhibition, will make up for an explosive mix. 3.3 out of 5 based on 13 reviews
2 Days in New York

Omniscore:

Certificate 15
Genre Comedy
Director Julie Delpy
Cast Chris Rock, Dylan Baker, Julie Delpy
Studio Network Releasing
Release Date May 2012
Running Time 91 mins
 

Marion has broken up with Jack and now lives in New York with their child. But when her family decides to come visit her, she's unaware that the different cultural background held by her new American boyfriend Mingus, her eccentric father, and her sister Rose who decided to bring her ex-boyfriend along for the trip, added to her upcoming photo exhibition, will make up for an explosive mix.

Reviews

The Independent on Sunday

Nicholas Barber

2 Days In New York is teeming with so many ideas that there isn't much room left for a plot. The dialogue covers parenting, race, sibling rivalry, the existence of the soul, and a lot more besides, while pulling off the rare trick of being hilarious in two languages.

20/05/2012

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The Observer

Philip French

Delpy and Rock are naturally funny and the stuff good, lightweight sitcoms are made of.

20/05/2012

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Empire Magazine

Liz Beardsworth

Delpy’s Parisian-eye view of New York is fresh and seductive. She has mastered that quintessentially French near-farcical comic style, keeping the pace breakneck and the dialogue fizzing. Yet amid the lunacy, Delpy finds time to return to key themes of love, life and loss. Now 43, her voice carries the timbre of experience: there’s a streak of sadness as Marion accepts the inevitable end of romance. Yet for all the world-weariness she presents, there’s a deliciously fun absurdity and an irrepressibility about Delpy that, even as she offers us an overtly jaded world, it’s still one in which it’s a pleasure to spend time.

14/05/2012

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The Financial Times

Raphael Abraham

At times the farcical goings-on risk being carried away by French flightiness and they might were it not for Rock, who lives up to his name by anchoring the film with his sobering, sardonic asides. But this is Delpy’s picture and she handles the writing-directing-starring juggler’s act well, showing an insightful eye for cross-cultural quirks and modern mores.

17/05/2012

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The Guardian

Steve Rose

Family relations and cross-cultural mishaps might be the stuff of Hollywood cliche, but Delpy whisks it all into a delightfully eccentric comedy, here, big on laughs, low on pretense, exaggerated but emotionally sincere – not least in Delpy's dealing with the death of her mother. We've rarely seen comedy this smart since Woody Allen and Seinfeld left New York.

17/05/2012

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The Times

Kate Muir

Although the story takes place over a two-day visit, this family get-together, like so many, somehow extends into a timeless purgatory, until Mingus is actually hopping with rage at the Barbarian invasion. As someone says, “It’s a reverse Waiting for Godot”. The Godots just keep on coming, and interfering, until we reach a pièce de résistance when sisters Marion and Rose have an all-out restaurant catfight.

18/05/2012

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Total Film

Neil Smith

What it all adds up to is an anything goes take on modern relationships with a side order of broad stereotype. Expect to be amused and bemused in equal quantities and you’ll be amply entertained.

08/05/2012

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The Scotsman

Alistair Harkness

Alas, where the original came alive thanks to amusing observations on modern coupledom and an insider’s view of its titular city, 2 Days in New York feels messier and less focused. Delpy is still fairly adorable, but the humour is too broad and the relationship insights too generic to inspire any great love for it.

17/05/2012

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The Daily Telegraph

Tim Robey

The movie is a limited, light diversion, but let’s give it this as well: it completely won me back round to the comic talents of Rock, whose own Hollywood vehicles have never let him range around scenes so appealingly. His facial expressions when fending off a mad, beardy French father-in-law who stinks of sausage and keeps wanting to knead him are alone worth the admission price.

17/05/2012

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Time Out

Cath Clarke

No, you’ve not got déjà vu. The title might look familiar. But this is French actress and filmmaker Julie Delpy taking to heart the line that directors make the same film over and over.

16/05/2012

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The Evening Standard

Charlotte O'Sullivan

The 43-year-old actress seems compelled to explore her funny side (funny ha ha and funny peculiar). And if this latest riff on the theme isn’t completely satisfying, its best moments still manage to create a lovely ache.

18/05/2012

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

Another featherweight rom-com that will do nothing to improve US-French relations.

18/05/2012

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The Sunday Times

Cosmo Landesman

What starts off as a cute family comedy, complete with clash of cultures, soon becomes a self-indulgent mess. Delpy is charming as ever and Rock refreshingly restrained, but she and her co-screenwriters have merely piled on the rows, bickering and banter in the vain hope that this will generate laughs and hold our interest.

20/05/2012

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