Even the Rain

Even the Rain

Obsessive idealist Sebastián has sworn to direct a film about one of the world’s most iconic figures, Christopher Columbus. He is determined to overturn the myth of the arrival of Western Civilization in the Americas as a force for good. His film will show what Columbus set in motion: the obsession with gold, the taking of slaves, and the terrible violence visited on those Indians who fought back. 2.8 out of 5 based on 10 reviews
Even the Rain

Omniscore:

Certificate 15
Genre Drama, History
Director Icíar Bollaín
Cast Luis Tosar, Najwa Nimri, Karra Elejalde, Gael García Bernal
Studio Dogwoof
Release Date May 2012
Running Time 103 mins
 

Obsessive idealist Sebastián has sworn to direct a film about one of the world’s most iconic figures, Christopher Columbus. He is determined to overturn the myth of the arrival of Western Civilization in the Americas as a force for good. His film will show what Columbus set in motion: the obsession with gold, the taking of slaves, and the terrible violence visited on those Indians who fought back.

Reviews

The Guardian

Mike McCahill

A smart, socially aware fable about a Spanish film crew – headed by Gael García Bernal as a kind of heartthrob Herzog.

17/05/2012

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Time Out

Dave Calhoun

Films about filmmaking can be navel-gazing, but Bollaín and Laverty offer a cutting, self-critical analysis of their medium while finding an honest and effective perspective on history – even if Tosar’s late conversion to the way of compassion seems to be missing the point.

16/05/2012

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The Observer

Philip French

... gripping ...

20/05/2012

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The Times

Kate Muir

Sometimes the drama forces the political points down your throat.

18/05/2012

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Total Film

Tom Dawson

Undeniably didactic drama, but scores points for stylistic ambition and its heartfelt sympathies towards the dispossessed.

08/05/2012

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The Evening Standard

Charlotte O'Sullivan

As the shoot progresses, Sebastian begins to unravel. Alas, so does the script. Daniel has no depth — an update of the noble savage, he’s savvy and noble. Permanently. As a result, dramatic tension drains from the screen and the last act, which sees a big change in Costa, is pure guilty-liberal wish-fulfilment.

18/05/2012

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

Laverty's script is wry about the difficulties of shooting in a foreign language and rather didactic about everything else, including the eternal nature of colonial exploitation. It's based on an actual dispute of 2000, when civil demonstrators made war on the corporate privatisation of water – "even the rain" was up for grabs.

18/05/2012

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The Scotsman

Alistair Harkness

Presenting the exploitation parallels with well-meaning if overly schematic bluntness, the hectoring tone they deploy undermines a film that chastises the movie industry for kowtowing to commercial demands while itself focusing on how exposure to real-life oppression mainly affects characters that can be played by world cinema box-office draws such as Bernal and Tosar.

17/05/2012

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

The film’s writer, Paul Laverty (Ken Loach’s regular screenwriter), fills the story with incident, but doesn’t quite make it subtle enough to be satisfying.

20/05/2012

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The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

If this were a Perils of Pauline episode, we’d laugh it off the screen.

17/05/2012

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