Tales of the Night

Tales of the Night

Set in a little cinema, three storytellers meet every night to act out various tales set in forests and cities of gold and populated with sorcerers, fairies and powerful kings. An instant classic and a visual delight for any child and parent. 3.0 out of 5 based on 6 reviews
Tales of the Night

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Animation, Fantasy
Director Michel Ocelot
Cast Marine Griset, Michel Elias Julien Beramis
Studio Soda Pictures
Release Date May 2012
Running Time 84 mins
 

Set in a little cinema, three storytellers meet every night to act out various tales set in forests and cities of gold and populated with sorcerers, fairies and powerful kings. An instant classic and a visual delight for any child and parent.

Reviews

Empire Magazine

David Parkinson

Replete with princesses, sorcerers, mythical beasts and sumptuous backdrops, this is a glorious demonstration of the silhouettist’s art.

21/05/2012

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The Evening Standard

The Evening Standard

The stories, in this case, are linked by scenes involving a writer, illustrator and editor, who brainstorm and search their computers for inspirational images, then slip into costumes like Mr Benn.

25/05/2012

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The Guardian

Mike McCahill

The pick-and-mix approach is limiting, but there's no denying these are gorgeous amuse-bouches, likely to be devoured by older, more discerning children and dyed-in-the-wool stoners alike.

24/05/2012

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Time Out

Cath Clarke

Tripping along on its own whimsy this playful, if slight, collection of six fairy tales from veteran French animator Michel Ocelot has charm in spades ... they have the adventure and back-to-front logic of a child’s dream: boys turn into wolves, horses talk, a giant spider snatches a princess up into its web. And they all finish with a moral at the end, as every good fairy tale should.

23/05/2012

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The Times

Kevin Maher

Ocelot’s patented style (all characters in silhouette, moving slowly, marionette-like, against a multicoloured backdrop) might be perplexing to those who are used to, say, Pixar’s more frenetic aesthetic. But the slow, measured approach is easily beguiling.

25/05/2012

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

Like a child's diorama transferred to the screen.

25/05/2012

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