Point Blank

Point Blank

Trainee nurse Samuel Pierret is dedicated to saving the lives of the men, women and children who pass through his busy hospital. His latest patient turns out to be thief Hugo Sartet, who is wanted by the cops and nefarious members of the Parisian underground. In order to escape capture, Hugo orders his henchmen to take Samuel's pregnant wife Nadia hostage. If the nurse can help Hugo evade capture then Nadia will be freed unharmed. 3.4 out of 5 based on 13 reviews
Point Blank

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Action / Adventure
Director Fred Cavayé
Cast Roschdy Zem, Gérard Lanvin, Elena Anaya Gilles Lellouche
Studio Vertigo Films
Release Date June 2011
Running Time 85 mins
 

Trainee nurse Samuel Pierret is dedicated to saving the lives of the men, women and children who pass through his busy hospital. His latest patient turns out to be thief Hugo Sartet, who is wanted by the cops and nefarious members of the Parisian underground. In order to escape capture, Hugo orders his henchmen to take Samuel's pregnant wife Nadia hostage. If the nurse can help Hugo evade capture then Nadia will be freed unharmed.

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Reviews

The Independent

Anthony Quinn

The film packs in so much one is surprised to learn that it runs for less than 90 minutes. Even during the somewhat incredible denouement at a chaotic police station, Alain Duplantier's camerawork is so frenetic you don't have time to stop and question it. As with Cavayé's first film, it's too entertaining to avoid being swallowed by Hollywood's giant maw and regurgitated as a remake.

10/06/2011

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The Daily Mail

James O'Brien

Corrupt cops and double-crossing criminals keep the action speeding along, while a superbly sustained sense of looming disaster leaves you rooting for Samuel in a way that you simply can’t for more traditional heroes. Magnifique!

09/06/2011

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Empire Magazine

Philip Wilding

... sparkling ...

11/06/2011

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Total Film

Matt Glasby

Manages to be gallopingly preposterous and an absolute blast, frequently at the same time.

31/05/2011

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The Observer

Philip French

The film is plausibly plotted and forcefully played, character is delineated through action, and there is no time for glib moralising. By the time Cavayé reaches the chaotic, brilliantly sustained climax in a police station, the conventional gap between the law and the underworld disappears and the criminal justice system is seen to be in complete moral confusion.

12/06/2011

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The Independent on Sunday

Nicholas Barber

There are no pauses for banter between the nurse and the deadpan crook – the humour is as quick and economical as everything else – but despite the breakneck speed and whiplashing plot twists, it's always clear what's happening, and it's all relatively logical. Haggis and Crowe should leave it well alone.

12/06/2011

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

... the whole thing charges along entertainingly enough ...

12/06/2011

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Variety

Jordan Mintzer

... provides few existential thrills but plenty of heart-racing action ...

01/12/2010

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The Evening Standard

Derek Malcolm

This is a reasonable if slightly confusing watch, recalling the work of someone like Phil Karlson, though it's distinctly French in tone.

10/06/2011

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

It is entirely ridiculous, but it certainly rattles along at a fair pace, and 80s screen buffs will appreciate the TV clip from Catalani's opera La Wally, and the consequent reminder of Jean-Jacques Beineix's 1981 movie Diva. I can see Ben Affleck directing the remake of this film, incidentally, playing opposite Jeremy Renner.

09/06/2011

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The Daily Telegraph

Tim Robey

The whole picture is pretending to be a lot grittier than it really is, but the experience is breathless enough that we barely care.

09/06/2011

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Time Out

David Jenkins

Point Blank is what we’d now have to term a ‘Liam Neeson Movie’. That is, it’s a steely genre caper, like Taken or Unknown, with a dash of brutal violence, a likable everyman protagonist who gets tangled in a criminal conspiracy and a vision of continental Europe as a hellish outland where, to quote Al Pacino in Heat, ‘You can get killed walkin’ your doggie!’

09/06/2011

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The Times

Wendy Ide

It’s tense, tricky and treacherous; a muscular thrill ride that should appeal to the audience that enjoyed Guillaume Canet’s crossover hit Tell No One.

09/06/2011

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