God Bless America

God Bless America

Loveless, jobless, possibly terminally ill, Frank has had enough of the downward spiral of America. With nothing left to lose, Frank takes his gun and offs the stupidest, cruelest, and most repellent members of society. He finds an unusual accomplice: 16-year-old Roxy, who shares his sense of rage and disenfranchisement. 2.7 out of 5 based on 14 reviews
God Bless America

Omniscore:

Certificate 15
Genre Comedy
Director Bobcat Goldthwait
Cast Joel Murray, Tara Lynne Barr, Mackenzie Brooke Smith, Melinda Page Hamilton, Guerrin Gardner, Rich McDonald
Studio Studio Canal UK
Release Date July 2012
Running Time 105 mins
 

Loveless, jobless, possibly terminally ill, Frank has had enough of the downward spiral of America. With nothing left to lose, Frank takes his gun and offs the stupidest, cruelest, and most repellent members of society. He finds an unusual accomplice: 16-year-old Roxy, who shares his sense of rage and disenfranchisement.

Reviews

Empire Magazine

Philip Wilding

The sparkling dialogue — the bloody attack in the cinema is as cruel as it is clever — keeps the film afloat, with verbal barbs lacerating everything from inane celebrity culture to the cult of Diablo Cody. That and the growing bond between Frank and Roxy, plus the fact that the film takes a surprising U-turn, lifts it above the basic premise of a disgruntled man shooting down a world in which he no longer fits.

03/07/2012

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Time Out

Tom Huddleston

As curmudgeonly grumbles go, this is thrillingly insightful and smart. A series of lengthy dialogue scenes, in which Goldthwait uses Murray as a mouthpiece to voice all of his most cherished complaints about life, are witty and wise. His big argument – that farting ringtones and exploitative TV contests aren’t just a bit of fun but indicate a yawning emptiness at the heart of modern society – is difficult to refute.

05/07/2012

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The Independent on Sunday

Jonathan Romney

Throughout the film, Frank and Roxy's jeremiads make you aware how much Goldthwait is putting his scripted thoughts into their mouths. But they are eloquent thoughts, and patently sane. There's political fury here, directed at America's hectoring shut-your-mouth Right – but more generally, a plea for being properly adult.

08/07/2012

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The Times

Wendy Ide

Bobcat Goldthwait’s manifesto for a new America is 104 minutes of cultural catharsis which may appeal to you if you have ever felt punching a hole in your flat screen rather than watch another Kardashian basking, lizard-like, in unearned publicity.

06/07/2012

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Total Film

Josh Winning

It’s the kind of cuckoo premise that director Bobcat Goldthwait excels at but, after a bracingly dark opening, GBA soon loses its edge, shying away from really testing Frank’s commitment to his outrageous mission.

28/06/2012

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The Los Angeles Times

Betsy Sharkey

As Roxy and Frank travel the country, their conversations become the place where attempts are made to justify the mayhem and murder, and this is where the thinking gets a little thin. It helps that Murray and Barr play the outrageous completely straight. As sensei and warrior in training, they make a good, if bizarre, match. The few times the film moves beyond farce to touch some real emotions — like Roxy's typical teenage worry that she's not very pretty or that her parents don't understand her — prove surprisingly nice.

11/05/2012

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

e or a protester carrying a "GOD HATES FAGS" placard. But Frank also shoots dead three kids who were rude and abusive in the cinema. Aggravating, certainly – but punishable by death? Goldthwait's script, born of a savage moral disgust, makes no distinction between people who "deserve to die" and people who just annoy us.

06/07/2012

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

For a while, the ranting is entertaining enough. Eventually, though, a plot is required, and the director, Bobcat Goldthwait, decides to send Frank on a killing spree. Even when it’s just a way of continuing the spleen-venting, this clichéd conceit is unsatisfying.

08/07/2012

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The Observer

Jason Solomons

It sounds like a funny idea, a sort of satirical Falling Down, but somehow the shoddiness of the film-making and the flatness of the writing dilute the anger and inspire a numbing tedium.

08/07/2012

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The New Statesman

Ryan Gilbey

Roxy isn’t a character so much as a personification of that moment when the film’s writer-director, Bobcat Goldthwait, watched Kick-Ass and fell a little bit in love with the idea of a schoolgirl swearing and killing people. She’s obviously acting as his mouthpiece when she sings the praises of Alice Cooper, or disparages the teen comedy Juno. Now, Juno was as bogus as they come but the idea that God Bless America is any more authentic or acerbic is the only funny idea in the movie. Goldthwait should have spent less time shoehorning his grudges into the script and more time making sure his film wasn’t simply caressing liberal egos.

04/07/2012

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The New York Times

Stephen Holden

Goldthwait’s screenplay is essentially a comedy act fleshed out with a story he doesn’t try to make convincing.

10/05/2012

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The Scotsman

Alistair Harkness

With God Bless America, stand-up comedian turned black-hearted filmmaker Bobcat Goldthwait unloads both barrels on contemporary American pop culture, gleefully shotgunning targets with the sort of reckless abandon that fatally undermines any points his scattershot polemic happens to make.

05/07/2012

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The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

The new film’s fire-power is too sloppy, too wide-spread; it barely scathes even the easy target of an American television talent show complete with Simon Cowell clone.

05/07/2012

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

The satire feels hand-me-down and weak, and Goldthwait is firing blanks.

05/07/2012

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