Died Young, Stayed Pretty

Died Young, Stayed Pretty

Died Young, Stayed Pretty is a candid look at the underground poster culture in North America. This unique documentary examines the creative spirit that drives these indie graphic artists. They pick through the dregs of America’s schizophrenic culture and piece them back together. What you end up with is a caricature of the black and bloated heart that pulses greed through the US economy. The artists push further into the pulp to grab the attention of passersby, plastering art that’s both vulgar and intensely visceral onto the gnarled surfaces of the urban landscape. The film gives us intimate look at some of the giants of this modern subculture. Outside of their own circle, they’re virtually unknown. But within their ranks they make up an army of bareknuckle brawlers, publicly arguing the aesthetic merits of octopus imagery and hairy 70s porn stars. They’ve created their own visual language for describing the spotty underbelly of western civilization and they're not shy about throwing it in the face of polite society. Along the way, they manage to create posters that are strikingly obscene, unflinchingly blasphemous and often quite beautiful. Yaghoobian shows these artists for what they are: the vivisectionists of America’s morbidly obese consumer culture.--©Official Site 2.2 out of 5 based on 7 reviews
Died Young, Stayed Pretty

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Documentary
Director Eileen Yaghoobian
Cast Art Chantry, Brian Chippendale Ames Brothers
Studio Norotomo Productions
Release Date October 2009
Running Time 95 mins
 

Died Young, Stayed Pretty is a candid look at the underground poster culture in North America. This unique documentary examines the creative spirit that drives these indie graphic artists. They pick through the dregs of America’s schizophrenic culture and piece them back together. What you end up with is a caricature of the black and bloated heart that pulses greed through the US economy. The artists push further into the pulp to grab the attention of passersby, plastering art that’s both vulgar and intensely visceral onto the gnarled surfaces of the urban landscape. The film gives us intimate look at some of the giants of this modern subculture. Outside of their own circle, they’re virtually unknown. But within their ranks they make up an army of bareknuckle brawlers, publicly arguing the aesthetic merits of octopus imagery and hairy 70s porn stars. They’ve created their own visual language for describing the spotty underbelly of western civilization and they're not shy about throwing it in the face of polite society. Along the way, they manage to create posters that are strikingly obscene, unflinchingly blasphemous and often quite beautiful. Yaghoobian shows these artists for what they are: the vivisectionists of America’s morbidly obese consumer culture.--©Official Site

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Reviews

The Daily Telegraph

Tim Robey

Though their obsession with death, tragedy and rebellion can feel immature, the film reminds us of a tactile, cut-and-paste subculture that’s still alive and well in the internet age.

09/10/2009

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Total Film

Jamie Russell

It’s weird, wacky and full of arresting promo images for bands like Arcade Fire, Teengenerate and Turbonegro.

21/09/2009

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Variety

Dennis Harvey

Eileen Yaghoobian's documentary presents a lot of good art and entertaining personalities in a package that's diverting on a moment-to-moment basis, but lacks any organizing principal or precise point to make the whole cohere.

19/06/2009

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The Sunday Times

Stuart McGurk

The equivalent of being trapped in the lift of an east London style magazine while the entire staff simultaneously shout their theories of civilisation at you, this documentary is that tragic thing, a perfectly fine five-minute short that’s been made into a jumbled, maddening 94-minute feature.

11/10/2009

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The Guardian

Xan Brooks

Eileen Yaghoobian's indulgent, cut-and-paste documentary hangs loose (and slightly awry) with the unsung titans of the concert poster.

09/10/2009

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The Observer

Philip French

The first full-length film by an Iranian-born Canadian, this is a mildly interesting documentary that takes at face value the claims made for their art by the naive nihilists who design jagged, violent and often obscene posters for local rock groups across North America.

11/10/2009

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The Times

Toby Young

Eileen Yaghoobian lacks any journalistic sense of the basic information the audience needs in order to grasp what’s happening onscreen and the film is often confusing.

09/10/2009

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