The September Issue

The September Issue

The September 2007 issue of Vogue magazine weighed nearly five pounds, and was the single largest issue of a magazine ever published. With unprecedented access, this film tells the story of legendary Vogue editor in chief Anna Wintour and her larger-than-life team of editors creating the issue and ruling the world of fashion. 3.6 out of 5 based on 9 reviews
The September Issue

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Documentary
Director R.J. Cutler
Cast Anna Wintour
Studio Momentum Pictures UK
Release Date September 2009
Running Time 90 minutes
 

The September 2007 issue of Vogue magazine weighed nearly five pounds, and was the single largest issue of a magazine ever published. With unprecedented access, this film tells the story of legendary Vogue editor in chief Anna Wintour and her larger-than-life team of editors creating the issue and ruling the world of fashion.

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Reviews

Empire Magazine

Damon Wise

Fashion is traditionally a subject for scorn, and anyone who takes it seriously is mostly deemed to be pretentious, superficial or both. The September Issue, however, throws such preconceptions out of the window. Ostensibly a fly-on-the-wall study of the making of the biggest annual issue of the famous fashion bible, it doesn’t have so much to say about magazine production as it does about the passion that feeds into it, and it will be a rare individual who doesn’t emerge from this film with newfound respect for Vogue’s editorial staff.

02/11/2009

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The Financial Times

Simon Schama and Karl French

This makes for mildly insightful viewing, and is consistently engaging, while never coming close to convincing the agnostic that the fashion world is other than frivolous.

09/09/2009

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

The reality may look a little muted after the wacky fictional treatments in The Devil Wears Prada and Ugly Betty. But it's an intriguing study of office politics, and we do get to see a flash of that famous froideur.

10/09/2009

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The Times

Toby Young

You’re so used to thinking of the fashion world as a ridiculous, Ab Fab sort of place, that any film that doesn’t take the mickey out of it risks looking sycophantic. But having gained the trust of the Editor, Anna Wintour, and her retinue of emaciated courtiers, the director, R. J. Cutler, gradually gets under the surface of this glossy universe, and the resulting film feels accurate and true.

11/09/2009

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Time Out

Ben Walters

Consistently funny and engaging, ‘The September Issue’ is also a window onto the top echelon of an industry in which fanciful escapism is deadly serious.

10/09/2009

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The Times

Wendy Ide

But what Cutler’s fascinating glimpse behind the scenes at the influential magazine also shows is another, equally fearsome power behind the throne. Grace Coddington is Vogue’s artistic director and genius of styling. If Wintour is the business head behind the magazine, Coddington is its exuberant, artistic passion. T

12/09/2009

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The Observer

Philip French

For those like me to whom fashion is a closed book and Vogue a rarely opened magazine, Cutler's documentary about the run-up to the year's most important (and telephone directory-sized) issue of American Vogue is far more insightful than the fawningly impressed The Devil Wears Prada or the weakly satirical Prêt-à-Porter.

13/09/2009

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

Seasoned fashionistas might disagree, but I didn’t see any big surprises in the film’s coverage of this famously remote boss. The star of the show is Vogue’s creative director, Grace Coddington. The film displays both her talent and — quite a rarity in the world she inhabits — her down-to-earth sense of humour.

13/09/2009

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

It's not that the turtle-faced Wintour is cold and controlling – that may have helped her to do the job – it's that she doesn't have a remotely interesting thing to say about anything. I was more engaged by her teenage daughter, whose clear-sighted view of the fashion industry should be a corrective to all involved: "there are other things out there".

11/09/2009

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