We Live in Public

We Live in Public

Harris, often called the "Warhol of the Web", founded Pseudo.com, the first Internet television network during the infamous dot-com boom of the 1990s. He also curated and funded the ground breaking project "Quiet" in an underground bunker in NYC where over 100 people lived together on camera for 30 days at the turn of the millennium. With Quiet, Harris proved how we willingly trade our privacy for the connection and recognition we all deeply desire, but with every technological advancement such as MySpace, Facebook and Twitter, becomes more elusive. Through his experiments, including a six-month stint living with his girlfriend under 24-hour electronic surveillance which led to his mental collapse, Harris demonstrated the price we pay for living in public. --©Official Site 3.5 out of 5 based on 4 reviews
We Live in Public

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Documentary
Director Ondi Timoner
Cast Tom Harris
Studio Interloper Films
Release Date November 2009
Running Time 90 mins
 

Harris, often called the "Warhol of the Web", founded Pseudo.com, the first Internet television network during the infamous dot-com boom of the 1990s. He also curated and funded the ground breaking project "Quiet" in an underground bunker in NYC where over 100 people lived together on camera for 30 days at the turn of the millennium. With Quiet, Harris proved how we willingly trade our privacy for the connection and recognition we all deeply desire, but with every technological advancement such as MySpace, Facebook and Twitter, becomes more elusive. Through his experiments, including a six-month stint living with his girlfriend under 24-hour electronic surveillance which led to his mental collapse, Harris demonstrated the price we pay for living in public. --©Official Site

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Reviews

The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

Ondi Timoner’s film, which won the Sundance Grand Prix, is horribly compelling: an up-close look both at Harris’s experiments – including the underground commune in New York that licensed libertine living for the price of round-the-clock recording of every resident’s every act – and at Harris himself.

11/11/2009

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The Times

David Hayles

Ondi Timoner (Dig!) has put together a thrilling and occasionally disturbing portrait of a dotcom pioneer who is dangerously obsessed with control.

14/11/2009

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The Sunday Times

Cosmo Landesman

But this film is a fascinating piece of social and cultural history that explores the damage done to those who live to be seen.

15/11/2009

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The Times

Toby Young

Mercifully, Harris has now run out of money, but I fear we haven’t heard the last of him.

13/11/2009

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