It Might Get Loud

It Might Get Loud

Rarely can a film penetrate the glamorous surface of rock legends. It Might Get Loud tells the personal stories, in their own words, of three generations of electric guitar virtuosos – The Edge (U2), Jimmy Page (Led Zeppelin), and Jack White (The White Stripes). It reveals how each developed his unique sound and style of playing favorite instruments, guitars both found and invented. Concentrating on the artist’s musical rebellion, traveling with him to influential locations, provoking rare discussion as to how and why he writes and plays, this film lets you witness intimate moments and hear new music from each artist. The movie revolves around a day when Jimmy Page, Jack White, and The Edge first met and sat down together to share their stories, teach and play. 3.1 out of 5 based on 5 reviews
It Might Get Loud

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Documentary
Director Davis Guggenheim
Cast The Edge, Jack White Hjimmy Page
Studio Sony Pictures
Release Date January 2010
Running Time 98 mins
 

Rarely can a film penetrate the glamorous surface of rock legends. It Might Get Loud tells the personal stories, in their own words, of three generations of electric guitar virtuosos – The Edge (U2), Jimmy Page (Led Zeppelin), and Jack White (The White Stripes). It reveals how each developed his unique sound and style of playing favorite instruments, guitars both found and invented. Concentrating on the artist’s musical rebellion, traveling with him to influential locations, provoking rare discussion as to how and why he writes and plays, this film lets you witness intimate moments and hear new music from each artist. The movie revolves around a day when Jimmy Page, Jack White, and The Edge first met and sat down together to share their stories, teach and play.

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Reviews

The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

Three generations of virtuosi meet to compare notes and chords. Led Zeppelin’s Jimmy Page, U2’s The Edge and Jack White of The White Stripes are the musicians obsessed with every judder, screech and twangle they can conjure – and with exactly how, by the laws of acoustical science and technological evolution, their instruments do so. Even for me, a rock illiterate, this is interesting. So is the variety of human quirkiness on show.

07/01/2009

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The Observer

Philip French

This attractive documentary brings together in Los Angeles three celebrated rock guitarists to discuss their art and jam together in an old warehouse.

03/01/2009

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The Daily Telegraph

Tim Robey

There’s an air of bombastic self-congratulation to the project which may turn off the casual viewer, but fans and tech-heads will be in seventh heaven.

30/12/2009

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Time Out

Derek Adams

Granted, the film might have benefited from a trim and a more linear approach, but mostly it fulfils its role as an illuminating homage to both the protagonists involved and, above all, the guitar as popular music’s most timeless icon.

31/12/2009

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The Guardian

Andrew Pulver

Normally you'd only find this sort of thing lurking late at night on BBC2, but presumably the guiding hand of Davis "An Inconvenient Truth" Guggenheim is getting it a little more exposure than it might otherwise have merited. But it's a bizarre follow-up to the fifth biggest cinema documentary of all time, and one that's as testing on the patience as a 10-minute wobbly-tremolo solo.

05/01/2010

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