Capitalism: A Love Story

Capitalism: A Love Story

With both humour and outrage, Michael Moore's Capitalism : A Love Story explores a taboo question: What is the price that america pays for its love of capitalism. 3.1 out of 5 based on 15 reviews
Capitalism: A Love Story

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Documentary
Director Michael Moore
Cast Jimmy Carter, Congressman Elijah Cummings, Baron Hill, Marcy Kaptur, Sarah Palin, Michael Moore, Thora Birch William Black
Studio Paramount Pictures UK
Release Date February 2010
Running Time 120 mins
 

With both humour and outrage, Michael Moore's Capitalism : A Love Story explores a taboo question: What is the price that america pays for its love of capitalism.

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Reviews

The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

The film is good fun. Perhaps we have seen it all before, but you could say that of a sunrise. Every sunrise is different and Moore’s are usually worth getting out of bed for.

26/02/2010

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

Criticising "capitalism" will curl the lip of many a political sophisticate, on both left and right, but it is remarkable how the banker-shenanigans made this a live topic – but also remarkable how little it is discussed in the mainstream and how comfortably we have again ­returned to the status quo. Well, Michael Moore has succeeded in getting a film on this ­subject actually released in cinemas: a very sharp and entertaining one at that.

25/02/2010

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The Independent

John Walsh

But there's something self-righteous and teenage-lefty about his rhetoric. He ends with a virtual call to arms, and calls for "the opposite of capitalism – democracy". But surely the opposite of capitalism is communism or socialism. Why doesn't he call for that?

26/02/2010

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The New Statesman

Lisa Mullen

Yet this is precisely where Moore loses his nerve. He cheers on squatters who break back into their repossessed homes, and he urges his audience to take collective action. But the word "socialism" dies on his lips. Interviewing the only left-wing politician in Congress, Senator Bernie Sanders, he carefully stresses that he is a democratic socialist and not, you know, the evil kind. From a European perspective, it seems perverse to spend two hours criticising capitalism without once referring to Marx or attempting to extract any lessons from the chequered history of socialist experiment in other parts of the world.

25/02/2010

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The New Yorker

David Denby

Michael Moore’s “Capitalism: A Love Story” is something else—not a good movie or a coherent exposition of the meltdown but an emotional attack on capitalism as a system, an attempt, literally, to de-moralize capitalism.

05/10/2009

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The New York Times

Manohla Dargis

In the end, what is to be done? After watching “Capitalism,” it beats me. Mr. Moore doesn’t have any real answers, either, which tends to be true of most socially minded directors in the commercial mainstream and speaks more to the limits of such filmmaking than to anything else. Like most of his movies, “Capitalism” is a tragedy disguised as a comedy; it’s also an entertainment.

23/09/2009

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The Daily Telegraph

David Gritten

It’s an unwieldy subject and, predictably, it’s a mixed bag: on the one hand, Moore effectively tells small-scale stories illustrating how the rich and powerful screw the little people, while also indulging in windy, sentimental generalising.

25/02/2010

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Time Out

Ben Walters

The thesis that rapacious capitalism has horrific social consequences is credible and well illustrated, if hardly eye-opening to European viewers (or, frankly, to Moore’s likely audience at home); the suggestions that that same capitalism is undemocratic and currently vulnerable to more equitable alternatives require stronger arguments than Moore can rally here.

25/02/2010

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The Times

Wendy Ide

The film showcases Moore at his undeniably powerful best and his exploitative, manipulative worst.

26/02/2010

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Total Film

Jonathan Crocker

Trouble is, this cinematic spoon-feeding is getting old. Rolled out for more than two hours, his trusty arsenal is all here: film clips, comic musical cues and stunts that just aren’t cunning anymore. From attempting to make a citizen’s arrest at the AIG headquarters to covering Wall Street in crime-scene tickertape, Moore’s finally told the same joke too many times.

18/02/2010

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Variety

Leslie Felperin

It's a pugnacious riposte to his right-wing critics, but in the end, Moore also fails to answer his left-wing doubters, who will have plenty of evidence here that Moore's argument is less with capitalism as Marx and Engels understood it, or even as the North Koreans and Cubans do, than with capitalism's most egregious excesses in the U.S. His ideal is not the end of private ownership, just more cooperatively owned businesses where everyone shares the wealth and makes collective decisions. Moore merely flirts with counterpointing socialism with capitalism, and ultimately sets up an inoffensive-to-the-point-of-meaningless notion of democracy as capitalism's opposite.

05/09/2009

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Empire Magazine

Damon Wise

On one level, it’s an indictment of the Republican asset-stripping that cost America its industrial base and lost the country its footing in the global economy once its wartime foes had rebuilt themselves. On another, it’s about the disturbing times we live in, in which the banks appear to be above government and even the law. And on another, it’s about not trying to scare the American public too much into thinking Moore is a rabid commie: each time he makes a scathing point about the American system, he hastens to remind us that the system works; it just needs some people-power to fine-tune it.

01/03/2010

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

To sell anticapitalism to middle America, he resorts to mawkishly citing Jesus and the eye of a needle. A rant against capitalism’s excesses isn’t a bad idea right now, and there are moments when Moore’s plain anger is arresting.

28/02/2010

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The Observer

Philip French

The constant quotations from the Founding Fathers suggest his real concern is a somewhat nebulous betrayal of the American Dream. Democratic socialism is given little attention; references to what's happening outside America are vague; the material on Obama is now dated. Lionel Trilling's advice that in debate, if not in war, you should attack your opponents at their strongest, not their weakest points is something Moore seems never to have considered.

28/02/2010

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The Independent on Sunday

Jonathan Romney

The idea that Moore is a lone voice doesn't hold the same water since last year, and the film's urgency is somewhat undermined by the relieved implication that, with Obama in power, perhaps things will pan out nicely after all. Perhaps they will, but it takes the edge of Moore's polemic. Moore's Capitalism isn't bad, but for real provocation, maybe we should hold out for Jean-Luc Godard's Socialism, due later this year – and what a double bill that would make.

28/02/2010

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