Exit Through The Gift Shop

Exit Through The Gift Shop

The story of how an eccentric French shop keeper and amateur film maker attempted to locate and befriend Banksy, only to have the artist turn the camera back on its owner with spectacular results. Billed as 'the world's first street art disaster movie' the film contains exclusive footage of Banksy, Shephard Fairey, Invader and many of the world's most infamous graffiti artists at work. 3.8 out of 5 based on 9 reviews
Exit Through The Gift Shop

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Documentary
Director Thierry Guetta Banksy
Cast Shepard Fairey, Rhys Ifans, Space Invader Banksy
Studio Revolver
Release Date March 2010
Running Time 87 mins
 

The story of how an eccentric French shop keeper and amateur film maker attempted to locate and befriend Banksy, only to have the artist turn the camera back on its owner with spectacular results. Billed as 'the world's first street art disaster movie' the film contains exclusive footage of Banksy, Shephard Fairey, Invader and many of the world's most infamous graffiti artists at work.

Reviews

The Independent on Sunday

Andrew Johnson

It is beautifully layered, however, with a Postmodern self- referencing that sees a film within a film within a film. So what starts as a documentary about street art turns into a documentary about Banksy, and changes again into a documentary about the documentary before its blazing finale. It is also replete with the wit Banksy employs in his art.

28/02/2010

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The Daily Mail

Chris Tookey

Poor, poor Banksy. Four stars for Britain's most fashionable, Left-wing, renegade artist from the Daily Mail film critic! I feel I'm spray-painting graffiti all over his street cred.

05/03/2010

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

You're under no compunction to take the film seriously: but it does offer an insight, of a teasingly incomplete and semi-fictionalised sort, into Banksy's working life. We see his helpers carry away a London telephone box, take it to pieces in his workshop, replace the wackily twisted result in its original position and film the response from passersby. Nobody scratches their head or strokes their chin and wonders if it is "art" or if its creator might have "sold out". They just laugh their heads off. They enjoy it: it is absolutely hilarious and this, to my perhaps naive and untutored eye, is the most compelling argument in favour of Banksy and in favour of this chaotic film.

04/03/2010

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Time Out

Dave Calhoun

It profiles Banksy and prods at issues raised by his success, from originality to commercialisation. But it’s a wonky, sideways profile in that the film pretends not to be about Banksy. He – or whoever made the film – employs a fall guy to make himself look good. Call it passive self-promotion. Some even call it a hoax. But that’s missing the point: even if the final section of the film doesn’t feel as honest as the earlier parts, there’s nothing to suggest that the whole thing is made up... Part of the problem is that we expect a Banksy project to be a joke on us. Whatever the film is, it’s sparky and funny and invigorating to watch.

04/03/2010

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The Times

Wendy Ide

I am inclined to suspect that there is at least a level of deception at play here... I once met Banksy. It did not go well. What started out as a perfectly amiable chat descended into hostility when he talked about his favourite film and I gave my critical evaluation of it. The film was Life is Beautiful, the mawkish story of a man who creates a fictional alternative reality in a Nazi death camp. And the title of Guetta’s LA show? Life is Beautiful.

05/03/2010

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Variety

Peter Debruges

Most art documentaries serve as dull, glowing hagiographies of their subjects. Not so "Exit Through the Gift Shop," a raucously entertaining postmodern survey of guerrilla street art that appears to be one thing (a chronicle of the scene centered on its most enigmatic figure, Banksy), only to fold back on itself and examine would-be filmmaker Thierry Guetta instead.

25/01/2010

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

The sense of intrigue is unmistakable, and fortunately Exit, an odd, enfolded sort of documentary, delivers on all the build-up. It is partly an account of the rise of street art in the 1990s, in which Banksy's wall painting became an integral force, and partly a cautionary tale about the difference between creativity and hype.

05/03/2010

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The Observer

Philip French

This intriguing documentary spoof on the art world, a leg-pull rather like Orson Welles's final comic farewell F For Fake, is apparently part fact, part fiction, and carries no credit for direction.

07/03/2010

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The Daily Telegraph

David Gritten

I left Banksy’s film Exit Through the Gift Shop not knowing quite what to think. For Banksy, the talented, anonymous street artist and gifted prankster, that’s probably a good result.

04/03/2010

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