H2Oil

H2Oil

Ever wonder where American gets most of its oil? If you thought it was Saudi Arabia or Iraq, you are wrong. America's biggest oil supplier has quickly become Canada's oil sands. Located under Alberta's pristine boreal forests, the process of oil sands extraction uses up to four barrels of fresh water to produce only one barrel of crude oil. It goes without saying that water—its depletion, exploitation, privatization and contamination—has become the most important issue to face humanity in this century. At the same time, the war for oil is well underway across the globe. A struggle is increasingly being fought between water and oil, not only over them. Alberta's oil sands are at the centre of this tension. As the province rushes towards a large-scale extraction, the social, ecological and human impacts are hitting a crisis point. In only a few short years the continent will be a crisscross of pipelines, reaching from the arctic all the way to the southern US, leaving toxic water basins the size of Lake Ontario, and surface-mines as large as Florida. H2Oil follows a voyage of discovery, heartbreak and politicization in the stories of those attempting to defend water in Alberta against tar sands expansion. Unlikely alliances are built and lives are changed as they come up against the largest industrial project in human history..--©Official Site 2.2 out of 5 based on 7 reviews
H2Oil

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Documentary
Director Shannon Walsh
Cast Cathy Gratz, Aaron Mathers, Dr. John O'Connor, George Poitras Alan Adam
Studio Dogwolf
Release Date June 2010
Running Time 76 mins
 

Ever wonder where American gets most of its oil? If you thought it was Saudi Arabia or Iraq, you are wrong. America's biggest oil supplier has quickly become Canada's oil sands. Located under Alberta's pristine boreal forests, the process of oil sands extraction uses up to four barrels of fresh water to produce only one barrel of crude oil. It goes without saying that water—its depletion, exploitation, privatization and contamination—has become the most important issue to face humanity in this century. At the same time, the war for oil is well underway across the globe. A struggle is increasingly being fought between water and oil, not only over them. Alberta's oil sands are at the centre of this tension. As the province rushes towards a large-scale extraction, the social, ecological and human impacts are hitting a crisis point. In only a few short years the continent will be a crisscross of pipelines, reaching from the arctic all the way to the southern US, leaving toxic water basins the size of Lake Ontario, and surface-mines as large as Florida. H2Oil follows a voyage of discovery, heartbreak and politicization in the stories of those attempting to defend water in Alberta against tar sands expansion. Unlikely alliances are built and lives are changed as they come up against the largest industrial project in human history..--©Official Site

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Reviews

Time Out

Derek Adams

Despite covering similar ground as ‘Dirty Oil’, this third instalment in the Co-op’s ‘Tar Sands’ trilogy proves more illustrative and less scholarly.

10/06/2010

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The Observer

Philip French

...the same tragic story...

13/06/2010

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Empire Magazine

Patrick Peters

Alan Kohl’s aerial views of the scarred landscape are exceptional, but the animated interludes are less effective, while director Shannon Walsh often vacillates between poignant human interest stories and hard-hitting eco-activism.

13/06/2010

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The Evening Standard

Derek Malcolm

It never distinguishes between its moving human stories and a general eco-activism, which does nothing much to sharpen their individual cases.

11/06/2010

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The Guardian

Xan Brooks

Look: there again are the scarred lunar landscapes, the poisoned rivers, the displaced First Nation activists, the venal politicians who should regulate this industry and yet quite clearly don't.

10/06/2010

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

The arguments propounded on behalf of the environment look faultless, but they could be distilled into a 10-minute video campaign rather than stretched beyond an hour.

11/06/2010

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The Independent on Sunday

Nicholas Barber

...the environmental damage wrought by the Canadian oil industry makes There Will Be Blood look like Bambi....

13/06/2010

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