Good Hair

Good Hair

When Chris Rock's daughter, Lola, came up to him crying and asked, "Daddy, how come I don't have good hair?" the bewildered comic committed himself to search the ends of the earth and the depths of black culture to find out who had put that question into his little girl's head!.--©Official Site 3.4 out of 5 based on 14 reviews
Good Hair

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Documentary
Director Jeff Stilson
Cast Vanessa Bell Calloway, Sandra 'Pepa' Denton, Eve, Melyssa Ford Maya Angelou
Studio Icon Film Distributors UK
Release Date June 2010
Running Time 96 mins
 

When Chris Rock's daughter, Lola, came up to him crying and asked, "Daddy, how come I don't have good hair?" the bewildered comic committed himself to search the ends of the earth and the depths of black culture to find out who had put that question into his little girl's head!.--©Official Site

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Reviews

The Times

Kate Muir

...funny, insightful film...

25/06/2010

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Total Film

Ellen E Jones

A deserved winner of the special jury prize at Sundance, Good Hair makes you wish all comedy was this insightful and all docs this funny.

17/06/2010

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

Rock has come up with bold new insights into globalisation, race, sex and class. His film resembles, in many ways, the new wave of docu-polemics that sprang up in imitation of Michael Moore – and yet Rock is not angry, just amused, bemused and very entertaining.

24/06/2010

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The New York Times

Jeannette Catsoulis

Competently directed by Jeff Stilson, “Good Hair” employs humor as a medium for insightful and often uncomfortable observations on race and conformity. The film’s only misstep is its fixation on the competitors in a flamboyant Atlanta hair show.

09/10/2009

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The Observer

Jason Solomons

Rock is a genial interviewer and narrator. While I'd have liked a few more facts instead of jokey asides (is hair really India's biggest export after "software and statues with 80 sets of hands"?) his film is funny, illuminating and appropriately slick.

27/06/2010

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The Los Angeles Times

Betsey Sharkey

The result is the documentary "Good Hair," an amusing, poignant and surprisingly candid look at the topic with a disarming Rock coaxing answers and opinions from an eclectic cross section of African Americans, including Maya Angelou, Al Sharpton, actresses, models, stylists and everyday patrons of barber shops and beauty parlors around the country.

09/10/2009

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The New Yorker

Ben Greenman

Though the film deals with one narrow aspect of African-American life, its scope is surprisingly universal, due in large part to the wise, funny, and forthright interviews, with such subjects as the poet Maya Angelou, the actress Raven-Symoné, the rappers Salt and Pepa, and a group of barbershop patrons.

16/11/2009

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The Sunday Times

Peter Whittle

It’s just a bit too long, and for some reason men’s hair is completely ignored, but this film will nevertheless leave most people vastly more knowledgeable about this shadowy yet enormous industry.

27/06/2010

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The Daily Telegraph

Tim Robey

It’s an eye-opener, if a blatantly chauvinistic one: Rock’s main beefs seem to be that men have to pay for it, and upkeep of such a coveted accessory is a barrier to intimacy in the bedroom.

25/06/2010

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Time Out

Cath Clarke

The comedian Chris Rock fronts this informative rummage through the $9 billion US black hair industry in a style much like his stand-up comedy: hilarious, insightful and charming enough to let him get away with the flammable stuff.

24/06/2010

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Empire Magazine

David Hughes

Despite dozens of interviews and Rock's personal agenda, this isn't the hard-hitting expose it should have been.

28/06/2010

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The Evening Standard

Derek Malcolm

Jeff Stilson’s documentary tells us a lot of depressing facts but its narrator, Chris Rock, is remorselessly cheerful, content to be wry rather than culturally probing... But where’s the militancy questioning the need for black women to spend thousands of dollars to look more like white women? Rock and Stilson seem afraid of going down that road.

25/06/2010

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The Independent on Sunday

Nicholas Barber

Rock doesn't get to the roots of the issue.

27/06/2010

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

It's mostly good-natured, but it could do with a trim.

25/06/2010

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