When You're Strange

When You're Strange

WHEN YOU’RE STRANGE uncovers historic and previously unseen footage of the illustrious rock quartet and provides new insight into the revolutionary impact of its music and legacy.  Directed by award-winning writer/director Tom DiCillo and narrated by Johnny Depp, the film is an account of the band’s history.--©Official Site 3.0 out of 5 based on 13 reviews
When You're Strange

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Documentary
Director Tom DeCillo
Cast John Densmore, Robby Krieger. Johnny Depp
Studio The Works
Release Date July 2010
Running Time 86 mins
 

WHEN YOU’RE STRANGE uncovers historic and previously unseen footage of the illustrious rock quartet and provides new insight into the revolutionary impact of its music and legacy.  Directed by award-winning writer/director Tom DiCillo and narrated by Johnny Depp, the film is an account of the band’s history.--©Official Site

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Reviews

The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

...weirdly gripping documentary...

01/07/2010

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Empire Magazine

Kim Newman

Writer-director Tom DiCillo (Johnny Suede, Living In Oblivion) compiles contemporary footage (including vivid sequences from HWY, an unfinished underground film Morrison starred in) and still images in this documentary, avoiding talking-heads retrospective interviews but keepingthe story going with wry, detailed commentary read by Johnny Depp.

05/07/2010

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Time Out

Derek Adams

Unlike so many other rockumentaries about dead stars, Tom DiCillo’s biography doesn’t lumber itself with voxpops from band members and friends. Instead, the story is told via a montage of fascinating and rarely seen archive footage. Meanwhile Johnny Depp offers one of the most authoritative narratives in years, proving that, when he’s past acting, he should consider a twilight career in audiobooks.

01/07/2010

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The Independent on Sunday

Nicholas Barber

Doing without the perspective that might have come from new interviews or talking heads, DiCillo has pulled together an amazing amount of archive footage, and written a brisk chronology of the band for Depp to recite over the top. He never gets beneath the skin of his subjects, but a tragic picture emerges of Morrison as a restless, conflicted, and, yes, highly intelligent malcontent.

04/07/2010

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The Observer

Jason Solomons

Much of this film about America's most "dark and dangerous" rock band consists of previously unseen footage. You wouldn't know that, though, unless you read the press notes. Somehow, it all seems rather familiar anyway...

04/07/2010

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The Daily Telegraph

David Gritten

This is a far better bet than Oliver Stone’s ghastly Doors movie.

01/07/2010

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The Times

Wendy Ide

A touch too reverential in tone and rather obviously in thrall to the mythology of Jim Morrison, Tom DiCillo’s documentary When You’re Strange: A Film About the Doors is nonetheless a watchable study of rock’n’roll stardom and excess.

02/07/2010

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The Sunday Times

Cosmo Landesman

...a rather conventional from-riffs-to-ruin account ...

04/07/2010

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Total Film

Kevin Harley

Poet or pretentious pillock? Whatever your take on Jim Morrison, The Doors’ sex-reptile frontman, his charisma helps electrify Tom DiCillo’s flawed but intermittently thrilling documentary.

17/06/2010

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Variety

Rob Nelson

Though vastly improved since its Sundance premiere, Tom DiCillo's documentary ode to reptilian rocker Jim Morrison and his mellower bandmates in the Doors remains a rather unenlightened trip.

28/04/2010

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The Financial Times

Leo Robson

Only those fanatically interested in The Doors could possibly enjoy Tom DiCillo’s documentary When You’re Strange but they wouldn’t learn anything from it. And those who will learn something from it can have no interest whatsoever in The Doors. This leaves its intended audience somewhat unclear.

30/06/2010

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The Los Angeles Times

Randy Lewis

Whether by DiCillo's design or through the process of vetting it through the oft-contentious committee of those who control the Doors' ongoing artistic and business dealings, the film rejects many of the principles of basic storytelling, skipping any modern-day interviews with the surviving members or others who could shine a light on why the band's music and Morrison's memory have so long endured.

09/04/2010

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The New York Times

Stephen Holden

...muddled, pretentious assemblage of film clips of the band shot between 1966 and 1971, with solemn narration by Johnny Depp.

09/04/2010

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