South of the Border

South of the Border

There’s a revolution underway in South America, but most of the world doesn’t know it. Oliver Stone sets out on a road trip across five countries to explore the social and political movements as well as the mainstream media’s misperception of South America while interviewing seven of its elected presidents. In casual conversations with Presidents Hugo Chávez (Venezuela), Evo Morales (Bolivia), Lula da Silva (Brazil), Cristina Kirchner  (Argentina), as well as her husband and ex-President Nėstor Kirchner,  Fernando Lugo  (Paraguay), Rafael Correa (Ecuador), and Raúl Castro  (Cuba), Stone gains unprecedented access and sheds new light upon the exciting transformations in the region.--©Official Site 2.2 out of 5 based on 16 reviews
South of the Border

Omniscore:

Certificate 15
Genre Documentary
Director Oliver Stone
Cast Raúl Castro, Hugo Chávez Tariq Ali
Studio Dogwoof
Release Date July 2010
Running Time 102 mins
 

There’s a revolution underway in South America, but most of the world doesn’t know it. Oliver Stone sets out on a road trip across five countries to explore the social and political movements as well as the mainstream media’s misperception of South America while interviewing seven of its elected presidents. In casual conversations with Presidents Hugo Chávez (Venezuela), Evo Morales (Bolivia), Lula da Silva (Brazil), Cristina Kirchner  (Argentina), as well as her husband and ex-President Nėstor Kirchner,  Fernando Lugo  (Paraguay), Rafael Correa (Ecuador), and Raúl Castro  (Cuba), Stone gains unprecedented access and sheds new light upon the exciting transformations in the region.--©Official Site

Visit official website

Watch the trailer

Reviews

Time Out

Dave Calhoun

This is a spirited and necessary primer, not the last word on its subject.

29/07/2010

Read Full Review


The Times

Kevin Maher

The abiding image from Oliver Stone’s new documentary South of the Border is not a political one. It’s a shot of Stone himself, a self-declared former drug addict, munching greedily on a bowl of fresh coca leaves while Bolivia’s President Evo Morales earnestly explains his country’s troubled history.

30/07/2010

Read Full Review


The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

All the abuses of power and/or ruthless centralising of it, with which Chávez and co have been branded, are ignored by Stone. So, largely, are the pacts of convenience with Iran and North Korea. But in the Age of Fox, what do you expect? The wages of a one-sided argument from the right are that the left, at some point, gets its time to orate one-sidedly at the mic.

28/07/2010

Read Full Review


The Guardian

Steve Rose

Oliver Stone's study of South America's socialist "revolution" is unashamedly partisan and unintentionally hilarious – both of which make it highly watchable.

29/07/2010

Read Full Review


The New York Times

Stephen Holden

Because so little has been made in the United States about South America’s leftward continental drift, “South of the Border” is a valuable, if naïvely idealistic, introductory tutorial on a significant international trend. It ultimately proffers the vision of a pan-South American union that is economically and politically strong enough to realize the Bolivarian dream.

25/06/2010

Read Full Review


The Observer

Philip French

Stone looks like a benign version of Conrad Black, and his superficial movie is a healthy corrective to the coverage of Latin America in most of the North American media, especially the toxic bile spewed out by Fox News.

01/08/2010

Read Full Review


Variety

Jay Weissberg

A predictable compendium of Fox News clips on one side and peasants glad-handing their leaders on the other, the docu offers little genuine information and no investigative research, adopting a style even more polemical than Stone’s earlier docus on Fidel Castro and Yasser Arafat.

06/09/2009

Read Full Review


The Sunday Times

Cosmo Landesman

The film’s central argument — that media demonisation of men such as Chavez can lead to war and the mess that is Iraq — is unconvincing and the film never finds the idealistic uplift it desperately wants to impart to the viewer.

01/08/2010

Read Full Review


Total Film

Neil Smith

Yet Stone does his movie, his audience and himself a massive disservice by being his uncritical cheerleader – a role that, over the course of this highly watchable yet infuriating travelogue, comes uncomfortably close to supine lapdog.

20/07/2010

Read Full Review


The Independent on Sunday

Nicholas Barber

A little less back-slapping and a little more investigating would have helped him make a stronger case.

01/08/2010

Read Full Review


Empire Magazine

Adam Smith

Stone is right in saying that the voices of these leaders are either ignored or distorted by western media. But complex issues need nuanced questions and tenacious interviews, not the fawnings of a political fanboy.

01/08/2010

Read Full Review


The Evening Standard

Evening Standard Reporter

Stone wears his heart, along with his ego, on his sleeve. But his “why are you so great?” approach risks alienating even those who instinctively side with his political agenda.

30/07/2010

Read Full Review


The Los Angeles Times

Kenneth Turan

Though Stone's personality gets in the way, "South of the Border" does offer brief glimpses of these leaders and their personal styles that are instructive. Perhaps the greatest service this slapdash film provides is to leave us wanting to know more because it tells us so little.

02/07/2010

Read Full Review


The Daily Telegraph

Tim Robey

Stone’s interviewees come across as smart enough to face a bit more probing, but he does almost none, relying on the wily Chávez for deadpan jokes about which facility he’s building Iran’s nukes in.

29/07/2010

Read Full Review


The Independent

Anthony Quinn

While you may applaud his cocking a snook at the American media, it becomes clear that Stone is ill-equipped to conduct a serious political analysis of the continent. He gets amazing access to national leaders and yet, face to face with them, he doesn't even look interested in what they have to say.

30/07/2010

Read Full Review


The Daily Mail

Christopher Tookey

Stone distorts history, ignores a wealth of contradictory evidence and dismisses human rights as 'a new buzz phrase'.

29/07/2010

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore