No Impact Man

No Impact Man

Colin Beavan decides to completely eliminate his personal impact on the environment for the next year. It means eating vegetarian, buying only local food, and turning off the refrigerator. It also means no elevators, no television, no cars, busses, or airplanes, no toxic cleaning products, no electricity, no material consumption, and no garbage. No problem – at least for Colin – but he and his family live in Manhattan. So when his espresso-guzzling, retail-worshipping wife Michelle and their two-year-old daughter are dragged into the fray, the No Impact Project has an unforeseen impact of its own.--©Official Site 3.2 out of 5 based on 9 reviews
No Impact Man

Omniscore:

Certificate 15
Genre Documentary
Director Laura Gabbart and Justin Schein
Cast Colin Beavan Michelle Conlin
Studio Dogwoof
Release Date September 2010
Running Time 93 mins
 

Colin Beavan decides to completely eliminate his personal impact on the environment for the next year. It means eating vegetarian, buying only local food, and turning off the refrigerator. It also means no elevators, no television, no cars, busses, or airplanes, no toxic cleaning products, no electricity, no material consumption, and no garbage. No problem – at least for Colin – but he and his family live in Manhattan. So when his espresso-guzzling, retail-worshipping wife Michelle and their two-year-old daughter are dragged into the fray, the No Impact Project has an unforeseen impact of its own.--©Official Site

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Reviews

The Observer

Philip French

It's like a real-life American version of The Good Life but funnier, less smug and more instructive.

03/09/2010

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The Times

Dominic Wells

Brilliantly edited, this is an object lesson in making the political personal.

02/09/2010

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Variety

John Anderson

Proof that "eco" and "entertainment" aren't mutually exclusive, "No Impact Man" may be a socially progressive, environmentally conscious film, but it goes down far easier than, say, an all-natural, fiber-enriched peanut butter sandwich without a glass of soy milk. It's that rare doc (these days) that could go theatrical, largely because it's a film about a couple, more than a movement.

18/09/2010

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The Los Angeles Times

Betsy Sharkey

The structure of the film works like a basic primer as Beavan begins to analyze the family's lifestyle excesses seeking a range of solutions, from complete elimination to alternatives. There is no scientific rigor here; still it's hard not to be caught up in his enthusiasm...

11/09/2009

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The New York Times

A. O. Scott

Taken as a polemical documentary championing environmentally conscious action, “No Impact Man,” directed by Laura Gabbert and Justin Schein, is of little interest and less utility. It provides no new scientific insights or political arguments...“No Impact Man,” however, is not really an eco-documentary. There are plenty of those. But there are not many films that so unsparingly (if also, perhaps, inadvertently) expose the confused power dynamics of a certain kind of modern middle-class marriage.

11/09/2009

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Empire Magazine

Patrick Peters

An intriguing documentary offering trial and experiment. Somewhat didactic, it is not the greatest of cinematic exercises.

14/09/2010

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The Sunday Times

Alistair McKay

This documentary will appeal mostly to the converted.

05/09/2010

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The Daily Telegraph

David Gritten

Amiable enough, though it resembles a marketing tool for Beavan’s book about his project.

02/09/2010

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

Superdownsize Me could be the subtitle of this eco-conscious documentary, presented in all an too familiar format; it advances important and laudable ideas, but in a cliched, gimmicky way.

02/09/2010

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