Over Your Cities Grass Will Grow

Over Your Cities Grass Will Grow

In 1993 Anselm Kiefer left Buchen, Germany for La Ribaute, a derelict silk factory near Barjac. From 2000 he began constructing a series of elaborate installations there. Like a strange, sprawling village, La Ribaute extends over 35 hectares and is composed of old industrial buildings and working studios that link to a network of underground tunnels dug out by Kiefer, which run underneath pavilions built to house paintings and installations.--©Official Site 2.8 out of 5 based on 10 reviews
Over Your Cities Grass Will Grow

Omniscore:

Certificate U
Genre Documentary
Director Sophie Fiennes
Cast Klaus Dermutz Anselm Kiefer
Studio Artificial Eye
Release Date October 2010
Running Time 105 mins
 

In 1993 Anselm Kiefer left Buchen, Germany for La Ribaute, a derelict silk factory near Barjac. From 2000 he began constructing a series of elaborate installations there. Like a strange, sprawling village, La Ribaute extends over 35 hectares and is composed of old industrial buildings and working studios that link to a network of underground tunnels dug out by Kiefer, which run underneath pavilions built to house paintings and installations.--©Official Site

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Reviews

The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

It is a film that requires a calm and concerted investment of attention, and a kind of cultivated mental quiet. It is a valuable film that aspires to create an artistic response to its subject matter.

13/10/2010

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Total Film

Carmen Gray

Near dialogue free, it’s more intent on submerging us (with weighty, esoteric calm) in welding, paint-smattering and glass-smashing than explaining what drove creator Anselm Kiefer to leave his native Germany and dedicate himself to it.

11/10/2010

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

The tortured, lugubrious creations of the German artist Anselm Keifer (born 1945) are given a mesmerising showcase in Sophie Fiennes's documentary.

15/10/2010

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Empire Magazine

David Parkinson

An intriguing and compelling documentary that provides insight into Kiefer's artwork.

17/10/2010

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The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

The best sequences are the abstract camera-prowlings around the labyrinth, set to music by (who else?) Ligeti. The worst are Kiefer being interviewed by a German reporter – some artists really should let their art talk – and the overlong vignettes of Team Anselm chucking dust, broken glass and designer debris around.

13/10/2010

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Time Out

Dave Calhoun

Not for everyone, but if you’re willing to give yourself over to its pace, there’s much to enjoy.

14/10/2010

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The Times

Kate Muir

Fiennes’s filming, though elegiac, is so languid that you lose interest at some points. The result is too much time trapped in endless tunnels to the trilling of flutes and too much hagiography. Art fans will know that Kiefer initially drew attention to his work and his country’s dark past by photographing himself performing Nazi salutes in the landscape.

15/10/2010

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The Independent on Sunday

Nicholas Barber

But if Kiefer's methods are unpretentious, the same can't be said for Sophie Fiennes's numbingly slow documentary. A film to be watched, if at all, in a gallery, not a cinema.

17/10/2010

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The Daily Telegraph

Tim Robey

The grey, ghostly austerity of his work seems clearly evocative of a spiritual wasteland, an exploration of Nazism’s scarring aftermath. (Kiefer was born in 1945.) The film’s commitment to letting these pieces stake their own claim on the attention is impressive, and yet – there’s no non-Philistine way to say this – the running time is almost twice what you ideally want it to be.

14/10/2010

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The Sunday Times

Peter Whittle

Not so much a film as a piece of moving wallpaper, this interminable documentary from the director Sophie Fiennes takes for granted the fascination to be had in watching the creative process. It ain’t necessarily so.

17/10/2010

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