I'm Still Here

I'm Still Here

A documentary on the former actor Joaquin Phoenix's new rapping career. 3.5 out of 5 based on 14 reviews
I'm Still Here

Omniscore:

Certificate 15
Genre Documentary
Director Casey Affleck
Cast Anthony Langdon Joaquin Phoenix
Studio Optimum Releasing
Release Date September 2010
Running Time 108 mins
 

A documentary on the former actor Joaquin Phoenix's new rapping career.

Reviews

The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

I’m Still Here, actor Casey Affleck’s mesmerising documentary about the self-destructive career of his friend Joaquin Phoenix, film star, substance-abuser and failed rapper, has been called a car crash by some. That is unfair. To car crashes. The film is so far out, so spectacularly smashed and smoked on the highways of self-mortification, that it has to be called – what – a carmageddon?

15/09/2010

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

Good film; dodgy career move.

16/09/2010

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The Independent on Sunday

Jonathan Romney

It's a good performance, if one-dimensional. But in the end, you wonder what Project Phoenix actually reveals, other than that stars are infantile, fame lets you get away with murder, and the media machine is gullible. With or without the subsequent revelation, Phoenix comes across as a privileged prince. Look – he seems to be saying – I'm so compelling that I can make myself a monster with impunity.

19/09/2010

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The Observer

Philip French

Is this a genuine exercise in cinéma vérité, cruelly observing the public and private unwinding of a deeply disturbed man incapable of handling his career?... Or is I'm Still Here a brilliantly sustained if embarrassing faux-documentary criticising the cult of celebrity, the media and a gullible public?

19/09/2010

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The Daily Telegraph

Marc Lee

My guess is that almost all their film is staged, but it still gives an intriguing insight into the thinking of a movie star who suddenly begins to question his success and the value of what he does for a living. Maybe none of it is real, while all of it is true.

16/09/2010

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The Sunday Times

Cosmo Landesman

It’s too long, and in places it slips into self-indulgence, but Phoenix gives the best performance of his career as the bloated, burnt-out and bearded actor Joaquin Phoenix, making an ass of himself as he sucks up to P Diddy and implodes on The Late Show with David Letterman.

19/09/2010

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Total Film

James Mottram

Superb. Real or not, I’m Still Here is an incisive access-all-areas portrait of the artist. Indulgent yes, but also gut-achingly funny and, if you buy into it, oddly moving. 

14/09/2010

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Variety

Leslie Felperin

Result is an utterly fascinating experiment that apparently blends real and faked material to examine notions of celebrity, mental stability and friendship.

06/09/2010

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Empire Magazine

Damon Wise

Affleck's meta-satire riffs amusingly on celebrity culture without hitting too many faux-doc highs.

03/11/2010

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The New York Times

Manohla Dargis

More than a year later the joke continues, sputters, occasionally hits its target and finally wears out its welcome in “I’m Still Here,” a deadpan satire or a deeply sincere folly (my money is on the first option) about Mr. Phoenix’s recent roles as an acting dropout and would-be hip-hop artist.

09/09/2010

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Time Out

Dave Calhoun

‘I’m Still Here’ is best viewed as a fictional self-portrait. He is giving us a version of himself, ‘real’ or not, and Affleck is merely a collaborator. The problem is that the portrait that emerges is of a vain man-child, ill at ease with the world and his place in it. It might be honest, but it’s not pretty.

16/09/2010

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The Times

Kate Muir

Casey Affleck’s documentary I’m Still Here, about his brother-in-law Joaquin Phoenix, begins with video of the actor as a boy bravely jumping from high rocks into a river in Panama. By the end of the self-indulgent, irritating portrait, you’re desperate for the adult Phoenix to jump again, preferably from a skyscraper.

17/09/2010

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The Los Angeles Times

Kenneth Turan

Fake or not, "I'm Still Here" is no fun to watch, and in fact Phoenix's situation comes off as so dire that it becomes a reason to doubt the film's authenticity. Filming someone having a mental breakdown is embarrassing and exploitative at best, and the notion that director Affleck would take advantage of his own brother-in-law this way doesn't hold water, even in Hollywood.

10/09/2010

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

...more exasperating than exhilarating.

17/09/2010

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