Enemies of the People

Enemies of the People

In ENEMIES OF THE PEOPLE the men and women who perpetrated the massacres – from the foot-soldiers who slit throats to the party’s ideological leader, Nuon Chea aka Brother Number Two – break a 30-year silence to give testimony never before heard or seen.--©Official Site 3.7 out of 5 based on 7 reviews
Enemies of the People

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Documentary
Director Thet Sambath Rob Lemkin
Cast .
Studio Dogwoof
Release Date December 2010
Running Time 93 mins
 

In ENEMIES OF THE PEOPLE the men and women who perpetrated the massacres – from the foot-soldiers who slit throats to the party’s ideological leader, Nuon Chea aka Brother Number Two – break a 30-year silence to give testimony never before heard or seen.--©Official Site

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Reviews

The New York Times

Stephen Holden

“Enemies of the People” is extraordinary on several fronts. Mr. Thet Sambath’s father and brother were slain by Khmer Rouge militants, and his mother died in childbirth after her forced marriage to a militiaman. Yet as Mr. Thet Sambath gently coaxes peasants to confess to atrocities, there is not a shred of bitterness in his questioning. At times, Mr. Thet Sambath suggests a one-man Cambodian Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Instead of affixing blame, he seeks the healing power of confession.

29/07/2010

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Time Out

Derek Adams

This is patient, persistent, probing and fearless journalism of the highest order and it shocks to the core.

08/12/2010

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Empire Magazine

Patrick Peter

Intense and harrowing, Sambath's documentary will pin you to your seat.

12/12/2010

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The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

...enthralling investigative documentary.

08/12/2010

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The Guardian

Xan Brooks

Cambodian journalist Thet Sambath goes tramping through the farmyards, scattering the chickens, in search of ghosts. "We're making a documentary," he explains by way of introduction, although at times his film about the 1970s killing fields veers alarmingly close to an exorcism.

09/12/2010

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The Times

Wendy Ide

The result is a valuable historical document. What’s remarkable is the lack of recrimination Sambath brings to his project, just a reporter’s need for the unvarnished truth.

10/12/2010

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The Sunday Times

Peter Whittle

An unflashy use of archive adds context to a story largely untold, shamefully, until now.

12/12/2010

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