Catfish

Catfish

When Nev, the brother of documentary maker Ariel Shuman, falls in love with a girl on the internet, the two brothers - and Shuman's documentary partner Henry Joost- set off on a journey to find out who she really is. What they find in the Midwest isn't what they were expecting from her Facebook profile. 3.8 out of 5 based on 13 reviews
Catfish

Omniscore:

Certificate 12A
Genre Documentary
Director Ariel Shulman and Henry Joost
Cast Melody C. Roscher, Ariel Schulman, Yaniv Schulman Megan Faccio
Studio Momentum Pictures UK
Release Date December 2010
Running Time 86 mins
 

When Nev, the brother of documentary maker Ariel Shuman, falls in love with a girl on the internet, the two brothers - and Shuman's documentary partner Henry Joost- set off on a journey to find out who she really is. What they find in the Midwest isn't what they were expecting from her Facebook profile.

Reviews

Empire Magazine

Simon Crook

As for the directors, they’ve personally assured us it’s “100 per cent the real deal”. If that is the case, it’s still troubling – as filmmakers, they appear to seriously overstep ethical lines. Does this ruin the experience? Not really. The debate about Catfish’s veracity feels like part of Catfish’s puzzle. What’s not in doubt is that the film nails the social networking zeitgeist — and its predatory urban myths — better than any movie in memory.

23/12/2010

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The Financial Times

Leo Robson

The film reveals that the internet not only facilitates deception but also offers innumerable possibilities for detection too: if you’re going to lie, you’d better cover your tracks. But just as you think you’re heading towards thriller territory, with street-smart New Yorkers confronting Midwestern loons, the film mutates into a study of benevolence, understanding and forgiveness.

15/12/2010

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

It really is an intriguing modern tale of communication, intimacy, self-knowledge and the web: a great companion to The Social Network. Even if it were presented as fiction, it would still be startling, but had the film-makers Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman pitched it that way to a hard-faced Hollywood executive, he might have sunk it just by wondering about the absence of Skype.

16/12/2010

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

You could argue about Catfish for hours and still not reach a consensus. That's part of its cleverness, too. For some it will be a cautionary tale about a new alarming preference for virtual contact over the human sort. To more cynical observers it will be an exercise in opportunism from people who ought to know better. All I can say for certain is that it will absorb you from the first frame to the last.

17/12/2010

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The Daily Mail

Chris Tookey

It works initially as a ­suspenseful mystery and then turns into . . . something else. It would make a fascinating double-bill with next year’s Oscars front-runner, The Social Network.

17/12/2010

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The New York Times

A. O. Scott

Judged by the usual standards, it is a wretched documentary: visually and narratively sloppy; coy about its motives; slipshod in its adherence to basic ethical norms... But at the same time — precisely because of these lapses — “Catfish” is a fascinating document, at once glib, untrustworthy and strangely authentic. I say this with a heavy sigh: this is, by far, one of the most intriguing movies of the year.

16/09/2010

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The Observer

Philip French

...intriguing ...

19/12/2010

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The Daily Telegraph

Tim Robey

Catfish has the awkward distinction of being the most talked-about documentary this year, and yet the one that benefits most from going in as cold as possible. Any lengthy review will spoil it, or be forced into acts of blurb-contortionism to remain vague about what happens, while trying to convey what makes it unsettling, and deeply fascinating, and a telling snapshot of what mad nonsense the internet allows us to get away with.

16/12/2010

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The Times

Kate Muir

I won’t spoil the denouement, but the complexity of what unfurls is as distressing as it is intriguing.

17/12/2010

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Total Film

Neil Smith

Mark Zuckerberg’s bad year continues with a compelling doc exploring the potential pitfalls of his social network. Funny, unsettling and thoroughly engrossing, Catfish is the cat’s whiskers.

09/12/2010

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The Los Angeles Times

Robert Abele

In the end, their ready compassion for the construct of a well-intentioned, emotional artifice may frustrate more cynical moviegoers with appropriately nagging questions about amateur detective work.

17/09/2010

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The Sunday Times

Cosmo Landesman

It’s all too neat, whereas real life is all too messy. And there are specific things that don’t seem right... That said, Catfish is an engaging and stylistically impressive work. It moves from the rough and raw intimacy of the video diary to become a smooth and beautifully edited work, one that blends imagery drawn from Facebook, text messages and web surfing to create a stunning whole.

19/12/2010

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The Independent on Sunday

Jonathan Romney

Joost and Schulman want to make us think about gullibility, the unreliability of internet identity, and the kinds of fantasy and mutual delusion that online friendship entails. But Catfish muddies the water by not playing it straighter. Razzed up with fancy online-style graphics, the film comes across uncomfortably as a smug, slick novelty product.

19/12/2010

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