Inside Job

Inside Job

The global financial meltdown, at a cost of over $20 trillion, resulted in millions of people losing their homes and jobs. Through extensive research and interviews with major financial insiders, politicians and journalists, INSIDE JOB traces the rise of a rogue industry and unveils the corrosive relationships which have corrupted politics, regulation and academia. 4.0 out of 5 based on 15 reviews
Inside Job

Omniscore:

Certificate 12A
Genre Documentary
Director Charles Ferguson
Cast Daniel Alpert, William Ackman Matt Damon
Studio Sony Pictures UK
Release Date February 2011
Running Time 120 mins
 

The global financial meltdown, at a cost of over $20 trillion, resulted in millions of people losing their homes and jobs. Through extensive research and interviews with major financial insiders, politicians and journalists, INSIDE JOB traces the rise of a rogue industry and unveils the corrosive relationships which have corrupted politics, regulation and academia.

Reviews

The Daily Mail

Chris Tookey

One of the outstanding journalistic achievements of the past decade, this is a film that will leave anyone who watches it better informed and, quite rightly, angrier.

18/02/2011

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The New Yorker

David Denby

Many documentaries are good at drawing attention to an outrage and stirring up our feelings. Ferguson’s film certainly does this, but his exposition of complex information is also masterly. Indignation is often the most self-deluding of emotions; this movie has the rare gifts of lucid passion and informed rage.

18/10/2011

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The New York Times

A. O. Scott

The gist of this movie, which begins in a mood of calm reflection and grows angrier and more incredulous as it goes on, is unmistakably punitive. The density of information and the complexity of the subject matter make “Inside Job” feel like a classroom lecture at times, but by the end Mr. Ferguson has summoned the scourging moral force of a pulpit-shaking sermon. That he delivers it with rigor, restraint and good humor makes his case all the more devastating.

07/10/2010

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The Daily Telegraph

Tim Robey

The main thrust of Ferguson’s argument becomes the corruption of a system whose gamekeepers are also its poachers: regulation and safety mechanisms are hardly top priorities when the alleged protectors of the economy have so much vested in its exploitation. Not all of this is news, and some of it amounts to shouting at a brick wall, but it’s reasoned shouting.

17/02/2011

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Time Out

Dave Calhoun

You’ll need a clear head to follow this impressive and angry American doc about the financial meltdown, as it races through late-twentieth-century American economic policy...

17/02/2011

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The Times

Wendy Ide

The financial collapse that nearly took down the entire world is perhaps not the sexiest subject out there but in terms of its scrupulous journalistic instincts, confident editing and global impact, this film is the documentary contender to beat at this year’s Oscars.

18/02/2011

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Total Film

Jonathan Crocker

Despite leaving you flailing at times with its sheer weight of detail, this superior documentary is packed to the gills with enraging, depressing answers as to what ignited the 2008 recession.

05/02/2011

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Variety

Rob Nelson

Pic's historical overview of the past 30 years in Wall Street finance may contain little that's new, but its concise rendering here is suitably bone chilling.

15/05/2010

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The Independent on Sunday

(Unknown)

...the most pathetic and fascinating individuals in this film are the economists, whose uncomfortable links with private enterprise and the banks are excruciatingly dragged out of them. Fingering them is a novelty, and they come off badly. Especially enjoyable is a tetchy exchange with Glenn Hubbard, former economic adviser to George W Bush, and current dean of Columbia University Business School. No, he won't tell us his outside earnings.

20/02/2011

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The Observer

Philip French

...intelligent, riveting and informative

20/02/2011

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Empire Magazine

Damon Wise

In short, much more than Fahrenheit 9/11 or any of Michael Moore’s films, it is a true barometer of our times, in that it dispassionately explains the financial mess that we find ourselves in... sobering, angering, but beautifully restrained attempt to alert us to the robbery that’s been going on in plain sight...

18/02/2011

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

This film is as gripping as any thriller. Aided by some fascinating interviews, Ferguson lays out an awful story... Ferguson has no answers, other than a faintly unedifying hint that bankers could be brought low if rumours about their systemic addiction to drugs and prostitutes could be made to stick legally – like Al Capone's tax evasion.

17/02/2011

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

I have seen it described as a "classroom" documentary, which, in this case, is precisely what many of us require. By the end of it you won't be drumming your fingers and waiting for the bell; you'll be outraged and possibly horrified at what you've just learnt.

18/02/2011

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The Los Angeles Times

Kenneth Turan

This smart and confident film, thick with useful information conveyed with cinematic verve, lays out in comprehensive but always understandable detail the argument that the meltdown of 2008 was no unfortunate accident.

15/10/2010

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

...the beginner’s guide offered here doesn’t even measure up to primers that have been offered elsewhere in the media. The film relies on plain diagrams and narration delivered in a colourless tone by Matt Damon... it doesn't help that this American film has taken several months to reach British cinemas

12/02/2011

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