Tabloid

Tabloid

Tabloid follows the much stranger-than-fiction adventures of Joyce McKinney, a former “beauty queen” whose single-minded devotion to the man of her dreams leads her across the globe and directly onto the front pages of the British tabloid newspapers. Joyce’s crusade for love and personal vindication, as illustrated by Morris, takes her through a surreal world of gunpoint abduction, manacled Mormons, oddball accomplices, bondage modeling, magic underwear and dreams of celestial unions. This notorious affair is barking mad. 3.4 out of 5 based on 14 reviews
Tabloid

Omniscore:

Certificate 15
Genre Documentary
Director Errol Morris
Cast Joyce Bernann McKinney Kent Gavin
Studio Dogwoof
Release Date November 2011
Running Time 88 mins
 

Tabloid follows the much stranger-than-fiction adventures of Joyce McKinney, a former “beauty queen” whose single-minded devotion to the man of her dreams leads her across the globe and directly onto the front pages of the British tabloid newspapers. Joyce’s crusade for love and personal vindication, as illustrated by Morris, takes her through a surreal world of gunpoint abduction, manacled Mormons, oddball accomplices, bondage modeling, magic underwear and dreams of celestial unions. This notorious affair is barking mad.

Reviews

The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

A vivid picture of the way we lived then.

10/11/2011

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The Los Angeles Times

Kenneth Turan

The thoroughly entertaining Tabloid has more on its mind than unfolding a story so astonishing that you really don't know whether to laugh or cry. Questions about the nature of reality, what it is and to what extent it is knowable, are never far from this documentary's understandable fascination with the power and price of media celebrity.

15/07/2011

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The Daily Telegraph

Tim Robey

Terrifically entertaining...

10/11/2011

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Time Out

Trevor Johnston

Simple and raucous...

07/11/2011

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The Times

Wendy Ide

In that it deals with eccentricity and obsession, Tabloid bears some similarities to Morris’s earlier film Fast Cheap & Out of Control ... Of course, the salacious story is not the main fascination for Morris — as the title suggests, what intrigued him was the media response to it, and the continuing relationship with the woman at the centre of it.

11/11/2011

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Total Film

Neil Smith

A bizarre coda turns what begins as a playful exposé of the British media’s sensationalist excesses into a surreal voyage into a warped mind no reporter could invent.

08/11/2011

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

With hints of tabloid values in its own make-up, the film is a rollicking human-interest story.

13/11/2011

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Empire Magazine

Patrick Peters

[Morris] clearly finds his subject and her persecutors ghoulishly fascinating and the story faintly ridiculous. But he has surprisingly little to say about tabloid tactics or the extent to which the media reflects the society on which it reports.

07/11/2011

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The Evening Standard

Derek Malcolm

Morris suggests that you can sometimes find profundity in triviality - and though Joyce condemns herself out of her own mouth, it is always possible to feel sorry for a woman whose obsession has so totally ruled her life.

11/11/2011

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The Observer

Philip French

It's a bizarre "where are they now?" story of a rather unedifying kind, and one feels ashamed of laughing at this sad exhibitionist.

13/11/2011

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The New York Times

A. O. Scott

Although Mr. Morris caters to our never-sated appetite for titillating tidbits ... he also offers a bit of escapism. We can turn away from the ugly spectacle of cellphone hacking and political bullying currently roiling Rupert Murdoch’s empire and revisit the once-notorious case of the “Manacled Mormon,” which long ago offered the British reading public a bit of good, clean, dirty fun.

14/07/2011

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The Scotsman

Alistair Harkness

Providing a timely look at the destructive nature of chequebook journalism, [Morris] helps create some empathy for McKinney by showing how rival tabloids ruthlessly competed against one another to uncover and print the most salacious details of her story with little regard to the long-term impact it might have on those involved.

11/11/2011

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Screen

Howard Feinstein

[Morris has] opt[ed] for very light fare in Tabloid, which eschews not only re-enactments but also any penetrating observations.

17/09/2010

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The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

Morris giddies up the interview footage, which is mainly with McKinney, with pop-art-style graphics ... He hardly needs to tease confessions from McKinney, who showboats in all directions.

10/11/2011

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