Patience (After Sebald)

Patience (After Sebald)

A richly textured essay film on landscape, art, history, life and loss, Patience (After Sebald) offers a unique exploration of the work of internationally acclaimed writer W.G. Max Sebald via a walk through East Anglia tracking his most influential book, The Rings of Saturn. 3.2 out of 5 based on 10 reviews
Patience (After Sebald)

Omniscore:

Certificate 15
Genre Documentary
Director Grant Gee
Cast W. G. Max Sebald Jonathan Pryce
Studio Soda Pictures
Release Date January 2012
Running Time 90 mins
 

A richly textured essay film on landscape, art, history, life and loss, Patience (After Sebald) offers a unique exploration of the work of internationally acclaimed writer W.G. Max Sebald via a walk through East Anglia tracking his most influential book, The Rings of Saturn.

Reviews

The Observer

Philip French

Modest, immensely enjoyable.

20/01/2012

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The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

It just shows. It can take a stranger from a strange land to point out first, to his adoptive countrymen, the strangeness and wonder of their own land.

26/01/2012

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Total Film

Sam Wigley

A suitably arty attempt to convey some of the book’s rich patchwork of allusions and digressions.

16/01/2012

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The Times

Kevin Maher

One for the adventurous chin-stroking cineaste.

27/01/2012

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Empire Magazine

Ian Nathan

Gee retraces Sebald’s footsteps for a halfway effective “aesthetic response” to his writing — a literary pop video of monochrome imagery that falls short of the grace of his prose.

23/01/2012

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The Evening Standard

The Evening Standard

Gee ... conducts his quiet study with considerable skill, refusing to answer too many questions about this complicated and often pessimistic figure but giving us copious clues as to why he was regarded as one of Europe's most important post-war writers.

27/01/2012

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The Guardian

Xan Brooks

In keeping with the spirit of Sebald's writing, Gee's film is teasing, elegant and perhaps inevitably unresolved.

27/01/2012

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

Plainly it's required viewing for his readers, though the reverential lit-crit tone and non-cinematic scale might not seduce the uninitiated. BBC4 is the film's natural habitat.

27/01/2012

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

A good guide for newcomers to Sebald and a worthwhile resource for his fans.

29/01/2012

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Time Out

Nigel Floyd

Least successful are Gee’s attempts to capture Sebald’s elusive, self-mythologising persona, which merely end with his wandering off the point.

23/01/2012

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